Summary Report on the Blueprint for Youth Justice in the ACT 2012-22: Annual Progress Report 2014


The second Annual Progress Report for the Blueprint for Youth Justice in the ACT 2012-22 was released in January 2015. This summary provides an outline of key findings and trends.

About the Blueprint

The Blueprint for Youth Justice 2012-22 is a ten-year plan to guide the way government and community responds to children and young people who come into contact with the youth justice system in the ACT.

The seven strategies focus on:-

A three-year action plan of 45 activities support the Blueprint to achieve a vision of keeping young people ‘safe, strong and connected’.

Progress: where are we?

Year two of the three year action plan is complete. Of the 45 actions identified in the action plan:

Priorities: areas of work

Focus of work for 2013-14 has been on:

Major achievements

Work under the Blueprint continues to demonstrate reducing numbers of young people coming into contact with, or becoming further involved in the youth justice system (see table below).

This includes young people being apprehended, under youth justice supervision and in detention.

Number of young people being apprehended, under youth justice supervision and in detention

What is making the difference?

The data for the year two annual report shows sustained reductions in the number of young people coming into contact with, or becoming further involved in the youth justice system. This means that crime is being prevented, the impact of crime is reduced and public safety is improved. Initiatives that are contributing to the downward trend include:

Tracking the trends

While it is relatively early days in the life of the Blueprint and change will take time, we are already seeing the effect of initiatives.

From 2010-11 to 2012-13 there have been reductions in the number of young people apprehended by ACT Policing (29%) and under youth justice supervision (22%).

Young People apprehended by ACT Policing

Young people under youth justice supervision

How many young people are in the ACT?

On an average day* in 2012-13, there were:

Of these:

Type of offences

Most offences where children and young people were apprehended by ACT Policing related to:

Where to from here?

The third year of the implementation of the Blueprint will see the focus shift from consolidating changes to policy and practice in the areas of prevention and diversion to:

An ongoing challenge

The over-representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people in the youth justice system remains a challenge.

Although Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people aged 10-17 years make up 2% of the total ACT population, they represent 26% of all young people under youth justice supervision on an average day.

In 2012-13, an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young person was 13 times as likely to be under supervision during the year as compared with other young people. Nationally this figure is 17 times.

The Blueprint is making a difference. A one-year data snapshot for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people in the ACT shows reductions in:

Number of young people in supervision

*A note about the data

‘average day’ is calculated by summing the number of days each young person spends under supervision during the year and dividing this total by the total number of days in the financial year. The number of young people on an ‘average day’ are rounded and some young people may have moved between community-based supervision and detention on the same day, leading to discrepancies in totals.

Sources

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