In a life threatening emergency dial Triple Zero (000)

In a life threatening emergency dial Triple Zero (000)
ACT Public Hospitals

Canberra Hospital

5124 0000


Calvary Hospital

6201 6111

Mental Health

Call Mental Health Triage on

1800 629 354

(free call except from mobiles or public phones) or

6205 1065

Poisons Hotline

For a poison emergency in Australia call

131126

Drug and Alcohol Help Line

The Drug and Alcohol Help Line is available 24-hours, 7 days a week on

5124 9977

Health Protection Service

For after hours urgent public health matters including environmental health, radiation safety, food poisoning and communicable disease management phone:

(02) 6205 1700

healthdirect

24 hour health advice

1800 022 222

ACT State Emergency Service

Emergency help
during flood or storms

132 500

Common Dataset


What is the Common Dataset for Human Services?

This Common Dataset for Human Services provides a guide for the collection of relevant service user data across the human services system in the ACT. It was designed to support consistency in client journeys, experiences and outcomes.

When individuals and families (clients) seek and receive the supports and services they need, they provide information about who they are, their goals and needs, and what outcomes they want to see. This information is used by services to ensure the client is in the right place and receives the services that best meet their needs. This happens no matter which service the client receives across the ACT human services system, and therefore represents the data that is commonly collected by all services.

The Common Dataset is not intended to provide an exhaustive list of data required across all service delivery programs, but rather to provide a consistent approach to collecting data that is commonly collected. It is therefore, anticipated that services will continue to collect additional information specific to their service delivery needs.

The Common Dataset is divided into five groups and provides agreed data definitions based on national standards to facilitate a common language across the system.

Common dataset is devided to five groupsCommon dataset five groups

What is a Core or an Extended data item?

Each data item has been assigned as either ‘core’ or ‘extended’.

  • Core data items are a minimum requirement where appropriate depending on the level of service intensity.
  • Extended data items are specific to the service offered and may not be required by all services.

Services providing less intensive offers (such as community building and self-service), are likely to collect a smaller set of client data and information whereas, a service providing access, prevention and early intervention will collect more data from clients, and finally, intensive and statutory services are likely to collect most of the data items included in this Common Dataset and potentially many others.

List of Common Dataset Items (VERSION 4)

The Common Dataset will be regularly updated based on the development of new national data standards and to align to local policy context.

This list provides a comprehensive explanation and description of each of the data items within the Common Dataset. The list also includes suggested formatting requirements for the collection of data.

Click on the collapsible panel to open and close it.

1.1.1 Consent to collect information

Description (Core)
Whether the client has agreed to have personal information recorded, as represented by a code.

Format
Client—consent obtained indicator, Yes/no code N:
1.Yes
2.No

Guide for use
Staff training is needed so that they understand the importance of asking this question. Staff also need to ask at this time if we can contact client in the future if we need more information to deliver service effectively.

Each service will have a service specific way of asking this as organisations need to only collect personal information that is reasonably necessary or directly related to that service.

Related Data Collection Standards
N/A

1.1.2 Consent to share information (Core)

Description
Whether the client has agreed to have personal information shared, as represented by a code.

Format
Client—consent obtained indicator, Yes/no code N:
1.Yes
2.No
99. Partial

Guide for use
A general guide of what service specific statements should draw from is: "In order to deliver the best possible services to meet your needs, it might be necessary to share some of this information with ---specify appropriate entities for service--- to help develop your care network. This will only be done in accordance with the Information Privacy Act 2014 to ensure your needs are met."

Individuals and families must agree to personal information being shared with any other service/person, to identify services/people that must not be provided with personal information, and be advised how they can withdraw or change their consent.

Related Data Collection Standards
N/A

1.1.3 Partial Consent (Extended)

Description
If only partial consent, indicate what client does not want shared and with what entities.

Format
Text X[X(500)]

Guide for use
Clients need to have the opportunity to identify what personal information may not be shared.

Related Data Collection Standards
N/A

1.2.1 First name(s)(Core)

Description
The client's first name, preceding the family/last name (as given by client).

Format
Text X[X(39)]

Guide for use
A person should generally be registered using their preferred name as it is more likely to be used in common usage and on subsequent visits to an agency or establishment. The person's preferred name may in fact be their legal name.

The following format may assist with data collection:What is the given name you would like to be known by?

Related Data Collection Standards
AIHW-METeOR 613340, Person (name)—given name, 2016

1.2.2 Middle name(s)(Extended)

Description
The client’s middle name(s) (as given by client).

Format
text X[X(39)]

Guide for Use
Collecting of middle name data will help to ensure further accuracy of generating unique identifiers.

Related Data Collection Standards
N/A

1.2.3 Last name (s) (Core)

Description
The client’s family name or last name (as given by client).

Format
text X[X(39)]

Guide for Use
Some people do not have a family name and a given name: they have only one name by which they are known. If the person has only one name, record it in the 'Family name' field and leave the 'First name' blank.

Related Data Collection Standards
AIHW-METeOR (identifier 613331, 2016)   - Person (name)—family name

1.2.4 Is name given a pseudonym (Extended)

Description
Identify if name given by client is a pseudonym
(an alias or nick-name), as represented by a code.

Format
Yes/no code N :
1.Yes
2.No

Guide for Use
Birth name is usually preferred. However, there are circumstances when clients are known by different names such as using an abbreviated version, personal preference or a nick-name, or identity change such as change in family or gender. .

Related Data Collection Standards
N/A

1.2.5 Pseudonyms (Core)

Description
Identify if client is known by any other names.

Format
text X[X(39)]

Guide for Use
Some clients may use a number of pseudonyms. The service will need to identify whether it will collect all the names they use.

Related Data Collection Standards
N/A

1.3.1 Date of birth (Core)

Description
Information about the day, month and year that a client was born. It is advisable to collect this rather than an individual's stated age.

If using an estimate, use 1 January in the estimated year .

Format
expressed as DDMMYYYY

Guide for Use
Collect the date of birth and automatically calculate the client’s age for instance age at entry and age at exit from service.

It is suggested that automated calendar selection tools be used rather than free text. Calendar selection can also calculate at the same time the age from date of birth for verification.

Training of staff so that they understand why it is useful to repeat generated age back to client to verify correct data at entry point.

For estimated date of birth and/or services that do not record full date of birth (such as with survey data) it is recommended to use 1st day of the month if client knows month but not exact day. If month is unknown use 1st of January in the year.

Related Data Collection Standards
ABS 1200.0.55.006 – Age Standard version 1.7, 2014
AIHW-METeOR (identifier 269565, 2005) Person—date of birth
Aligns with SHIP

1.3.2 Date of birth estimate(Core)

Description
A marker noting if the date of birth provided is an estimate,  as represented by a code.

Format
Yes/no code N :
1.Yes
2.No

Guide for Use
N/A

Related Data Collection Standards
N/A

1.4.1 Sex (Extended)

Description
The biological sex of the client, as represented by a code.

Format
Code N:
1. M – Male
2. F – Female
3. X – Other
99 – Not stated

Guide for Use
The criterion used to distinguish the categories of the sex standard classification is the set of biological attributes that define the different types of sexes (i.e. males, females and others).

Male – Persons who have male or predominantly masculine biological characteristics, or male sex assigned at birth.
Female - Persons who have female or predominantly feminine biological characteristics, or female sex assigned at birth.
Other - Persons who have mixed or non-binary biological characteristics (if known), or a non-binary sex assigned at birth.

Related Data Collection Standards
ABS 1200.0.55.012 - Standard for Sex and Gender Variables, 2016

1.4.2 Gender

Description
The gender of the client, as represented by a code.

Format
Code: N
1. M – Male
2. F – Female
3. X – Other
99 – Not stated

Guide for Use
The criterion used to distinguish the categories of the gender standard classification is the set of factors that make up a person’s chosen identity within society.

Male – Adults who identify themselves as men, and children who identify themselves as boys
Female – Adults who identify themselves as women, and children who identify themselves as girls
Other – Adults and children who identify as non-binary, gender diverse, or with descriptors other than man/boy or woman/girl.

The client may choose not to provide information on this item.

Related Data Collection Standards
ABS 1200.0.55.012 - Standard for Sex and Gender Variables, 2016

1.5.1 Fixed address (Core)

Description
Whether the client has a fixed address.

Format
Code: N
1.Yes
2.No

Guide for Use
If yes, proceed to complete all below address items.

Related Data Collection Standards
N/A

1.5.2 Unit number (Extended)

Description
The unit number of the client's home address represented alphanumerically.

Format
text X[X(6)]

Guide for Use
Use G-NAF to ensure correct data entered for address at beginning.

The Geocoded National Address File (referred to as G-NAF) is a freely available authoritative, geocoded address file containing more than 13 million Australian physical address records.
For services that do not record the whole address (such as survey data or homelessness data) we recommend using a different address recording system using suburb, postcode and state drop down options such as that provided by Australia Post in their standard postcode file.

Multiple addresses can be listed depending on service need.
If possible, collect 1.5.4 Client Street Name as core.

Related Data Collection Standards
AIHW-METeOR identifier 611149, Address components cluster, 2016
AIHW – METeOR – Address
Aligns with SHIP.

1.5.3 Street number (Extended)

Description
Street number of the client's home address represented numerically.

Format
text X[X(15)]

Guide for Use
Use G-NAF to ensure correct data entered for address at beginning.

The Geocoded National Address File (referred to as G-NAF) is a freely available authoritative, geocoded address file containing more than 13 million Australian physical address records.
For services that do not record the whole address (such as survey data or homelessness data) we recommend using a different address recording system using suburb, postcode and state drop down options such as that provided by Australia Post in their standard postcode file.

Multiple addresses can be listed depending on service need.
If possible, collect 1.5.4 Client Street Name as core.

Related Data Collection Standards
AIHW-METeOR identifier 611149, Address components cluster, 2016
AIHW – METeOR – Address
Aligns with SHIP.

1.5.4 Street name(Extended)

Description
The name of the street of the client's home address represented as text.

Format
text X[X(44)]

Guide for Use
Use G-NAF to ensure correct data entered for address at beginning.

The Geocoded National Address File (referred to as G-NAF) is a freely available authoritative, geocoded address file containing more than 13 million Australian physical address records.
For services that do not record the whole address (such as survey data or homelessness data) we recommend using a different address recording system using suburb, postcode and state drop down options such as that provided by Australia Post in their standard postcode file.

Multiple addresses can be listed depending on service need.
If possible, collect 1.5.4 Client Street Name as core.

Related Data Collection Standards
AIHW-METeOR identifier 611149, Address components cluster, 2016
AIHW – METeOR – Address
Aligns with SHIP.

1.5.5 Street type (Extended)

Description
The street type (e.g. street, place, avenue etc.)

Format
text X[X(44)]

Guide for Use
Use G-NAF to ensure correct data entered for address at beginning.

The Geocoded National Address File (referred to as G-NAF) is a freely available authoritative, geocoded address file containing more than 13 million Australian physical address records.
For services that do not record the whole address (such as survey data or homelessness data) we recommend using a different address recording system using suburb, postcode and state drop down options such as that provided by Australia Post in their standard postcode file.

Multiple addresses can be listed depending on service need.
If possible, collect 1.5.4 Client Street Name as core.

Related Data Collection Standards
AIHW-METeOR identifier 611149, Address components cluster, 2016
AIHW – METeOR – Address
Aligns with SHIP.

1.5.6 Suburb (Core)

Description
The name of the locality/suburb/town of the client’s home address represented as text.

Format
code (Postcode datafile) {NNNN}

Guide for Use
Use G-NAF to ensure correct data entered for address at beginning.

The Geocoded National Address File (referred to as G-NAF) is a freely available authoritative, geocoded address file containing more than 13 million Australian physical address records.
For services that do not record the whole address (such as survey data or homelessness data) we recommend using a different address recording system using suburb, postcode and state drop down options such as that provided by Australia Post in their standard postcode file.

Multiple addresses can be listed depending on service need.
If possible, collect 1.5.4 Client Street Name as core.

Related Data Collection Standards
AIHW-METeOR identifier 611149, Address components cluster, 2016
AIHW – METeOR – Address
Aligns with SHIP.

1.5.7 Postcode(Core)

Description
The Australian numeric descriptor for a postal delivery area for the client’s address.

Format
code (Postcode datafile) {NNNN}

Guide for Use
Use G-NAF to ensure correct data entered for address at beginning.

The Geocoded National Address File (referred to as G-NAF) is a freely available authoritative, geocoded address file containing more than 13 million Australian physical address records.
For services that do not record the whole address (such as survey data or homelessness data) we recommend using a different address recording system using suburb, postcode and state drop down options such as that provided by Australia Post in their standard postcode file.

Multiple addresses can be listed depending on service need.
If possible, collect 1.5.4 Client Street Name as core.

Related Data Collection Standards
AIHW-METeOR identifier 611149, Address components cluster, 2016
AIHW – METeOR – Address
Aligns with SHIP.

1.5.8 State (Core)

Description
The State or Territory of the client's home address, represented as code.

Format
code through drop-down options. AA[A]

ACT – Australian Capital Territory
NSW - New South Wales
NT – Northern Territory
QLD – Queensland
SA – South Australia
TAS – Tasmania
VIC – Victoria
WA – Western Australia
AAT – Australian Antarctic Territory

Guide for Use
Use G-NAF to ensure correct data entered for address at beginning.

The Geocoded National Address File (referred to as G-NAF) is a freely available authoritative, geocoded address file containing more than 13 million Australian physical address records.
For services that do not record the whole address (such as survey data or homelessness data) we recommend using a different address recording system using suburb, postcode and state drop down options such as that provided by Australia Post in their standard postcode file.

Multiple addresses can be listed depending on service need.
If possible, collect 1.5.4 Client Street Name as core.

Related Data Collection Standards
AIHW-METeOR identifier 611149, Address components cluster, 2016
AIHW – METeOR – Address
Aligns with SHIP.

1.5.9 Address current as of (Extended)

Description
The date the client moved into their current address.

Format
Date moved DDMMYYYY

Guide for Use
To support service providers in reviewing the client’s provisional information.

Related Data Collection Standards
N/A

1.6.1 Telephone number (Extended)

Description
The number used as a contact method that is associated to a unique provision of telephone service, as represented alphanumerically.

Format
text X[X(15)]

Guide for Use
The format and length of a telephone number is dependent on the attribute(s) of the device and how the device connects to the telephone network.

Clients are given the opportunity to provide more than one telephone number.

Related Data Collection Standards
AIHW-METeOR identifier 452682, Address – Telephone Number, 2015

1.7.1 Unique identifier (Extended)

Description
Mainly used within business processes, they are codes which represent an individual client, and which may be alphabetical, numeric, or alpha-numeric.

Format
text X[X(45)]
[N]N

Guide for Use
Client IDs can be automatically generated from client management systems. For any one client, one unique number is assigned to them to reduce duplication of client records.

Related Data Collection Standards
N/A

1.7.2 Statistical linkage key (Extended)

Description
To support the linking of client data between services and systems.

Format
XXXXXDDMMYYYYN

Guide for Use

Statistical data linkage refers to the bringing together of data from different sources to gain a greater understanding of a situation or individual from the combined (or linked) dataset. This facilitates a better understanding of the patterns of service use by groups of clients for research, statistical or policy analysis, planning and evaluation purposes.

The linkage key form is: XXXXXDDMMYYYYN

The sequence in which the linkage key is completed is as follows:

  • Family name (the first 3 Xs) (2nd, 3rd, and 5th letters of the family name).
  • Given name (the 4th and 5th X) (2nd and 3rd letters of given name)
  • Date of birth by day, month and four-digit year (date of birth DDMMYYYY)
  • Sex (N) (1. Male, 2. Female, 3.Intersex or indeterminate, 4.Not stated/inadequately described)

For example: John Smith, born on 1 January 2017, male = MIHOH010120171

Where the client’s given or family name is not long enough, fill in any remaining boxes with a ‘2’.

Where part of the name is missing or unknown, fill in any missing boxes with a ‘9’.

Related Data Collection Standards
AIHW-METeOR identifier 349895, Statistical linkage key 581, 2014
Aligns with SHIP

2.1.1 Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander status (Core)

Description
Whether a client self-identifies as an Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander client; or of non-Indigenous origin, as represented by a code.

Format
Code:
1. Aboriginal
2. Torres Strait Islander
3. Both Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
4. Neither Aboriginal nor Torres Strait Islander
99. Not stated/inadequately described

Guide for Use
This information can be obtained through self-enumeration or direct questioning which enables the individual to nominate whether they identify as Aboriginal; Torres Strait Islander; both Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander or neither Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander.

This is collected because:

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders represent important demographic groups.
  • This information enables the identification of the needs of these client groups and analysis of the availability and appropriateness of services for them.
    How to complete
  • ‘Are you of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander origin?’ should be asked of all clients regardless of appearance, country of birth or whether staff know the client or their family background.
  • It is strongly recommended that this question be asked directly wherever possible.

Related Data Collection Standards
Aligns with SHIP

2.2.1 Country of Birth (Core)

Description
The country the client identifies as being the one in which they were born.

Format
Refer to ABS Standard 1269.0 Table 1.3 and Table 2

Guide for Use
Table 1.3 Major groups, minor groups and countries and Table 2 Supplementary codes (for former countries and geographic entities and for inadequate data).

Related Data Collection Standards
ABS – 1269.0 Standard Australian Classification of Countries (SACC) 2016, released 28 March 2017.

2.2.2 Main language spoken at home (Core)

Description
The main language spoken in the client’s home to communicate with other residents of the home or setting and regular visitors, as represented by a code.

Format
Drop down menu for coding: N
1. No, English
2. Yes, Arabic
3. Yes, Dinka
4. Yes, Vietnamese
5. Yes, Spanish
6. Yes, Burmese
7. Yes, Mandarin
8. Yes, Cantonese
9. Yes, Hindi
10. Yes, Urdu
11. Yes, Farsi
12. Yes, Italian
13. Yes, Greek
14. Yes, Korean
15. Yes, Other (please specify)
99. Not stated/inadequately described

Guide for Use
If more than one language, indicate the one that is spoken most often. If English is chosen as main language do not ask 2.2.3, 2.2.4, 2.2.5.

Suggested method of asking question is to follow ABS format: Do you/Does the person/Does (name)/ Will (name of child under two years) speak a language other than English at home?

This information can be obtained through self-enumeration or direct questioning which enables the individual to nominate which language they most frequently speak at home
An individual may require assistance in answering this question and appropriate support should be considered by organisations.

The top 14 languages were determined by analysing languages most commonly spoken in CSD client management systems and the ABS Census data. If language is not included, select other and enter language at item 2.2.3.

Related Data Collection Standards
Developed by CSD based on ABS – Language Standards, 2016 (cat.no. 1200.0.55.005) ‘Main Language Other Than English spoken at home’.

2.2.3 Other language (Extended)

Description
If ‘other’ is selected in 2.2.2, then specify client’s main language spoken at home.

Format
text X[X(45)]

Guide for Use
N/A

Related Data Collection Standards
N/A

2.2.4 Proficiency in English (Core)

Description
Where a client has indicated that their main language spoken at home is a language other than English, they can identify how proficient they are in the English language.

Format
Rate client language proficiency
Code N:
1. Not at all
2. Not well
3. Well
4. Very Well
99. Not stated/inadequately described

Guide for Use
This information is only intended to be collected where an individual has indicated that English is not their main language spoken at home (see previous data item). It can be collected from an individual using a self-enumerated question which includes a selection of responses ranging from ‘not at all’ to ‘very well’. An individual may require assistance in answering this question and appropriate support should be considered by organisations.

Related Data Collection Standards
ABS – Language Standards, 2016, (cat.no. 1200.0.55.005) 'Proficiency in Spoken English'
AIHW – METeOR – Person – Proficiency in Spoken English

2.2.5 Translator (Extended)

Description
A marker noting if a translator is required.

Format
Yes/no code N :
1.Yes
2.No

Guide for Use
This data item is used to support improved service delivery of language services.

Related Data Collection Standards
N/A

2.2.6 Ancestry (Extended)

Description
The client may like to provide information about their ancestry, ethnicity or cultural background.

Format
text X[X(45)]

Guide for Use
Ancestry describes the ethnic or cultural heritage of a person, that is, the ethnic or cultural groups to which a person’s forebears are or were attached. In practice, Ancestry is the ethnic or cultural groups which the person identifies as being his or her ancestry. For example, a respondent may indicate four ancestries because each grandparent is from a different ethnic or cultural background (say Italian, Greek, German, English).

However, another person with the same ancestry may choose to identify as ‘Australian’ because one or both parents were born in Australia, or because of a cultural or national attachment to this country. Ancestry therefore involves measures of self-identification of ethnic or cultural group affiliation or nationality as well as of descent from one or more particular groups.

Related Data Collection Standards
N/A

2.2.7 Year of arrival in Australia (Extended)

Description
The year a client (born outside of Australia) first arrived in Australia, from another country, with the intention of staying in Australia for one year or more.

Format
Data type: Year
Expressed as YYYY
99. Don’t know

Guide for Use
It is suggested that automated calendar selection tools be used rather than free text. Repeat year back to client to verify typed correctly.
"In which year did [(name)] first arrive in Australia to live (for one year or more)?"

Related Data Collection Standards
ABS - 6250.0 - Characteristics of Recent Migrants, Australia, June 2017

2.2.8 Residency (Extended)

Description
Whether the client is an Australian citizen, permanent resident or visa holder, as represented by a code.

Format
Drop down menu for coding
1. Permanent Skilled
2. Permanent Family
3. Permanent Humanitarian

Guide for Use

  • Australian citizen – All persons who have obtained Australian citizenship.
  • Permanent Skilled - Skilled migrants are selected on the basis of their age, skills and their ability to quickly make a contribution to the Australian economy. Includes Independent, Family or government sponsored, and Employer sponsored visas
  • Permanent Family - Includes Partner, Child and Parent visas
  • Permanent Humanitarian - Includes Special Humanitarian Program and Refugee visas
  • Permanent Other/n.f.d. - Includes all other permanent visa categories
  • Temporary Student - Temporary student visas are granted to people studying or seeking study, training or skills development in Australia, and are planning to stay in Australia for 12 months or more.
  • Temporary Skilled - Skilled migrants are selected on the basis of their age, skills and their ability to quickly make a contribution to the Australi
  • Temporary Family - including Partner, Child and Parent visas
  • Temporary Humanitarian - including Temporary Protection visas and Safe Haven Enterprise Visas.
  • Temporary Other/n.f.d. – includes tourists, working holiday makers and visitors planning to stay in Australia for 12 months or more, temporary skilled migrant visas, temporary family visas and temporary humanitarian visas including temporary protection visas and Safe Haven Enterprise visas, or where the type of temporary visa could not be determined.
  • Temporary Skilled - Skilled migrants are selected on the basis of their age, skills and their ability to quickly make a contribution to the Australian economy. Includes Independent, Family or government sponsored, and Employer sponsored visas.

Related Data Collection Standards
ABS - 6250.0 - Characteristics of Recent Migrants, Australia, June 2017

2.2.9 Visa category (Extended)

Description
Any other specific details of the client’s visa.

Format
text X[X(45)]

Guide for Use
The specific details of the client’s visa may be relevant for the delivery of service, including eligibility criteria.

Related Data Collection Standards
N/A

2.3.1 Disability Flag (Core)

Description
Does the client have a limitation, restriction or impairment which has lasted, or is likely to last, for at least six months and restricts everyday activities?

This includes:

  • loss of sight (not corrected by glasses or contact lenses)
  • loss of hearing where communication is restricted, or an aid to assist with, or substitute for, hearing is used
  • speech difficulties
  • shortness of breath or breathing difficulties causing restriction
  • chronic or recurrent pain or discomfort causing restriction
  • blackouts, seizures, or loss of consciousness
  • difficulty learning or understanding
  • incomplete use of arms or fingers
  • difficulty gripping or holding things
  • incomplete use of feet or legs
  • nervous or emotional condition causing restriction
  • restriction in physical activities or in doing physical work
  • disfigurement or deformity
  • mental illness or condition requiring help or supervision
  • memory problems or periods of confusion causing restriction
  • social or behavioural difficulties causing restriction
  • long-term effects of head injury, stroke or other acquired brain injury causing restriction
  • receiving treatment or medication for any other long-term conditions or ailments and still being restricted
  • any other long-term conditions resulting in a restriction.

Format
Code: N
1. Yes
2. No
99. Not stated/inadequately described

Guide for Use
Disability/special assistance screening indicator. When Yes is selected, the functional assessment questions should be asked. These can either be based on AIHW standards (items 2.3.2 to 2.3.4) or ABS standards (2.3.5 to 2.3.7) as applicable to the service.

It is recommended that Disability Services consider use of the Washington Group question sets which contain more detail and cover various ages. http://www.washingtongroup-disability.com/.

Some services seek confirmation of diagnosed disability, others directly ask the client. Depending on the service offer, this can either be answered by the service or the client. There is a specific disability diagnosis item at 2.3.10.

Clients ages should be taken into consideration when responding to this question. The limitation, restriction or impairment must be due to the person’s disability and should be ongoing (have lasted or be expected to last for 6 months or more). It must relate to the extent of need over and above that which would usually be expected due to their age, that is, it should be evaluated in relation to a person of the same sex without a disability.

Related Data Collection Standards
Developed by CSD. Question sourced from definition used in Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers (ABS 4430.0.10.001)

2.3.2 Self care activities (Extended)
AIHW(SHIP)

Description
Does the client ever need someone to help with their self care activities?

  • e.g. doing everyday activities such as showering or bathing, dressing or undressing, toileting and eating food

Format
Code: N
1. Always/sometimes need help and/or supervision
2. Have difficulty, but don’t need help/supervision
3. Don’t have difficulty, but use aids/equipment or medication
4. Have no difficulty
99..Don’t know

Guide for Use
How to ask this question

  • The question should be asked of all clients where item 2.3.1 is marked as Yes, where the service provider choses to use AIHW data standard.
  • The question should be answered from the perspective of the client. A carer can answer on behalf of the client.
  • The question should always be introduced in the following way:
    • This question is about whether a long-term health condition or disability restricts your everyday activities. A long-term health condition is one that has lasted, or is expected to last, 6 months or more.
    • Examples of long-term health conditions that might restrict your everyday activities include severe asthma, epilepsy, mental health condition, hearing loss, arthritis, depression, autism, kidney disease, chronic pain, speech impairment and stroke.

Always/sometimes need help and/or supervision

  • The client always or sometimes needs help/supervision to perform activities in this life area.
  • Do not select for children if help/supervision is required only because of their young age and they do not have a disability or long-term health condition.

Have difficulty, but don’t need help/supervision

  • The client has difficulty, but does not need help/supervision to perform activities in this life area. Don’t have difficulty, but use aids/equipment or medication
  • The client does not need help/supervision but uses aids/equipment to enable them to perform everyday activities in this life area.
  • Examples of aids/equipment include animals used for personal mobility (such as guide dogs and companion animals), prosthetic and orthotic devices, wheelchairs, transfer devices and so forth.
    Examples of medications are, blood pressure medication, renal dialysis, and so forth.

Have no difficulty

  • The client has no difficulty and does not need help/supervision and does not use aids or equipment to perform activities in this life area.
  • Select for all young children who do not have a long-term health condition or disability, who still need help/supervision because of their young age.

Don’t know

  • The information is not known or the client has refused to provide the information.
  • For children who only need help/supervision because of their young age, select ‘Have no difficulty’.
  • For young children who have a disability and/or long-term health condition, select the appropriate level of difficulty.

Related Data Collection Standards
Based on SHIP

2.3.3 Body movement/Mobility(Extended)
AIHW (SHIP)

Description
Does the client need help/supervision with mobility?

  • e.g. moving around the house, moving around outside the home, getting in or out of a chair

Format
Code: N
1.Always/sometimes need help and/or supervision
2.Have difficulty, but don’t need help/supervision
3.Don’t have difficulty, but use aids/equipment or medication
4.Have no difficulty
99..Don’t know

Guide for Use
How to ask this question

  • The question should be asked of all clients where item 2.3.1 is marked as Yes, where the service provider choses to use AIHW data standard.
  • The question should be answered from the perspective of the client. A carer can answer on behalf of the client.
  • The question should always be introduced in the following way:
    • This question is about whether a long-term health condition or disability restricts your everyday activities. A long-term health condition is one that has lasted, or is expected to last, 6 months or more.
    • Examples of long-term health conditions that might restrict your everyday activities include severe asthma, epilepsy, mental health condition, hearing loss, arthritis, depression, autism, kidney disease, chronic pain, speech impairment and stroke.

Always/sometimes need help and/or supervision

  • The client always or sometimes needs help/supervision to perform activities in this life area.
  • Do not select for children if help/supervision is required only because of their young age and they do not have a disability or long-term health condition.

Have difficulty, but don’t need help/supervision

  • The client has difficulty, but does not need help/supervision to perform activities in this life area. Don’t have difficulty, but use aids/equipment or medication
  • The client does not need help/supervision but uses aids/equipment to enable them to perform everyday activities in this life area.
  • Examples of aids/equipment include animals used for personal mobility (such as guide dogs and companion animals), prosthetic and orthotic devices, wheelchairs, transfer devices and so forth.
    Examples of medications are, blood pressure medication, renal dialysis, and so forth.

Have no difficulty

  • The client has no difficulty and does not need help/supervision and does not use aids or equipment to perform activities in this life area.
  • Select for all young children who do not have a long-term health condition or disability, who still need help/supervision because of their young age.

Don’t know

  • The information is not known or the client has refused to provide the information.
  • For children who only need help/supervision because of their young age, select ‘Have no difficulty’.
  • For young children who have a disability and/or long-term health condition, select the appropriate level of difficulty.

Related Data Collection Standards
Based on SHIP

2.3.4 Visa Communication activities (Extended)
AIHW(SHIP)

Description
Does the client need help/supervision with communication?

  • e.g. understanding or being understood by other people, including people they know

Format
Code: N
1. Always/sometimes need help and/or supervision
2. Have difficulty, but don’t need help/supervision
3. Don’t have difficulty, but use aids/equipment or medication
4. Have no difficulty
99. Don’t know

Guide for Use
How to ask this question

  • The question should be asked of all clients where item 2.3.1 is marked as Yes, where the service provider choses to use AIHW data standard.
  • The question should be answered from the perspective of the client. A carer can answer on behalf of the client.
  • The question should always be introduced in the following way:
    • This question is about whether a long-term health condition or disability restricts your everyday activities. A long-term health condition is one that has lasted, or is expected to last, 6 months or more.
    • Examples of long-term health conditions that might restrict your everyday activities include severe asthma, epilepsy, mental health condition, hearing loss, arthritis, depression, autism, kidney disease, chronic pain, speech impairment and stroke.

Always/sometimes need help and/or supervision

  • The client always or sometimes needs help/supervision to perform activities in this life area.
  • Do not select for children if help/supervision is required only because of their young age and they do not have a disability or long-term health condition.

Have difficulty, but don’t need help/supervision

  • The client has difficulty, but does not need help/supervision to perform activities in this life area. Don’t have difficulty, but use aids/equipment or medication
  • The client does not need help/supervision but uses aids/equipment to enable them to perform everyday activities in this life area.
  • Examples of aids/equipment include animals used for personal mobility (such as guide dogs and companion animals), prosthetic and orthotic devices, wheelchairs, transfer devices and so forth.
    Examples of medications are, blood pressure medication, renal dialysis, and so forth.

Have no difficulty

  • The client has no difficulty and does not need help/supervision and does not use aids or equipment to perform activities in this life area.
  • Select for all young children who do not have a long-term health condition or disability, who still need help/supervision because of their young age.

Don’t know

  • The information is not known or the client has refused to provide the information.
  • For children who only need help/supervision because of their young age, select ‘Have no difficulty’.
  • For young children who have a disability and/or long-term health condition, select the appropriate level of difficulty.

Related Data Collection Standards
Based on SHIP

2.3.5 Self Care Activities (Extended)
ABS

Description
Does the person ever need someone to help with, or be with them for, self care activities?

  • e.g. doing everyday activities such as eating, showering, dressing, toileting.

Format
Code: N
1. Yes, always
2. Yes, sometimes
3. No
99. Not stated/inadequately described

Guide for Use

  • The question should be asked of all clients where item 2.3.1 is marked as Yes, where the service provider choses to use ABS data standard.
  • For children who only need help/supervision because of their young age, select ‘Have no difficulty’.
  • For young children who have a disability and/or long-term health condition, select the appropriate level of difficulty.

Related Data Collection Standards
Based on the ABS 2016 census questions on disability.

2.3.6 Body Movement/Mobility (Extended)
ABS

Description
Does the person ever need someone to help with, or be with them for, body movement activities?

  • e.g. getting out of bed, moving around the home or at places away from home.

Format
Code: N
1. Yes, always
2. Yes, sometimes
3. No
99. Not stated/inadequately described

Guide for Use

  • The question should be asked of all clients where item 2.3.1 is marked as Yes, where the service provider choses to use ABS data standard.
  • For children who only need help/supervision because of their young age, select ‘Have no difficulty’.
  • For young children who have a disability and/or long-term health condition, select the appropriate level of difficulty.

Related Data Collection Standards
Based on the ABS 2016 census questions on disability. 

2.3.7 Communication Activities (Extended)
ABS

Description
What are the reasons for needing special assistance?

Format
Code: N
1. Yes, always
2. Yes, sometimes
3. No
99. Not stated/inadequately described

Guide for Use

  • The question should be asked of all clients where item 2.3.1 is marked as Yes, where the service provider choses to use ABS data standard.
  • For children who only need help/supervision because of their young age, select ‘Have no difficulty’.
  • For young children who have a disability and/or long-term health condition, select the appropriate level of difficulty.

Related Data Collection Standards
Based on the ABS 2016 census questions on disability.

2.3.8 Reasons for Special Assistance

Description
What are the reasons for needing special assistance?

Format
Code: N
1. No need for help or supervision
2. Short-term condition (lasting less than 6 months)
3. Long-term condition (lasting 6 months or more)
4. Old or young age
5. Difficulty with English language
99. Other

Guide for Use
Code through drop-down options. Allow for multiple selection.

Related Data Collection Standards
Based on the ABS 2016 census questions on disability. 

2.3.9 Reasons for assistance - other (Extended)
ABS

Description
If answer in 2.3.8 is ‘other’, please specify.

Format
text X[X(45)]

Guide for Use
N/A

Related Data Collection Standards
Based on the ABS 2016 census questions on disability. 

2.3.10 Disability diagnosis(Extended)
ABS

Description
Has the client ever received a disability diagnosis from a health professional? (e.g.doctor or specialist)

Format
Code: N
1. Yes
2. No
99.Don’t know

Guide for Use
Ask whether the client has ever been diagnosed with a disability by a health professional

Response definitions
Yes - The client has been formally diagnosed by a health professional as having a mental health issue.
No - The client has never been formally diagnosed by a health professional as having a mental health issue.
Don’t know - The information is not known or the client has refused to provide the information. Not applicable -

Related Data Collection Standards
Developed by CSD based on SHIP (diagnosed with a mental health issue question)

2.3.11 Mental health diagnosis (Extended)

Description
Has the client ever received a mental health diagnosis from a health professional? (e.g. psychiatrist, psychologist, doctor)

Format
Code: N
1. Yes
2. No
99.Don’t know

Guide for Use

  • Ask whether the client has ever been diagnosed with a mental health condition by a health professional.
  • If the client is aged under 15, only complete this question if you, the agency worker, think it appropriate. Select ‘Not applicable’ if the question is not asked.
  • Health professionals who may diagnose a mental health condition include:
    • psychologists
    • psychiatrists
    • general practitioners
    • mental health registered nurses.

Response definitions
Yes - The client has been formally diagnosed by a health professional as having a mental health issue.
No - The client has never been formally diagnosed by a health professional as having a mental health issue.
Don’t know - The information is not known or the client has refused to provide the information.
Not applicable - There is no consent for information to be provided to the AIHW.

Related Data Collection Standards
Developed by CSD based on SHIP (diagnosed with a mental health issue question)

2.3.12 Time period a client has received services or assistance for a mental health need (Extended)

Description
What time period has the client received services or assistance for their mental health issue?

Format
Code: N
1. Currently receiving services
2. Received services in the last 12 months
3. Received services more than 12 months ago
4. Received services no timeframe reported
5. No services ever received
99.Don’t know
0. Not applicable

Guide for Use
This is collected because it will identify how recently the client has received mental health services.

Ask how long it has been since the client has received services for their mental health issue. This should be answered from the perspective of the agency worker. It relates to the agency worker’s knowledge of whether or when the client has received mental health services or assistance.

Response definitions:
Currently receiving services - Receiving ongoing services at the time the support period started.
Received services in the last 12 months - Not currently receiving services but has received services in the last 12 months.
Received services more than 12 months ago - The last services the client received were more than 12 months ago.
Received services—no timeframe reported - The client has received services but you are not able to determine when this took place.
No services ever received - The client has never received any services or assistance for a mental health issue.
Don’t know - The information is not known or the client has refused to provide the information. Not applicable - The client has never been formally diagnosed by a health professional as having a mental health issue; that is, you recorded ‘No’ for the previous question,

Related Data Collection Standards
Aligns with SHIP

2.3.13 Any additional information, informal or formal, that indicates the client currently has a mental health issue (Extended)

Description
Was there any additional information, informal or formal, that indicates the client has a mental health issue?

Format
Code:
1. Agency worker
2. Health professional
3. Non-government agency
4. Family/friends/carers
5. Self-identified
6. Other
7. No information indicating mental illness
0. Not applicable

Guide for Use
This is collected because it enables identification of a mental health issue that may not have been formally diagnosed by a health professional and would otherwise not be reported.

This relates to the client’s situation at the beginning of the support period. It should be answered from the perspective of the agency worker. Only select one source. If there are a number of sources of information, you should mark the source you consider to be the most reliable; for example, a formal diagnosis or a formal referral from an agency or institution would take precedence.

A mental health condition is a medical condition that impairs thought, mood or behaviour resulting in distress or impaired functioning. It may include depression, anxiety disorders, bipolar disorder, psychosis, schizophrenia and so forth. If there is not enough information to answer this question for children, select ‘No information indicating mental illness’.

Response definitions:
Agency worker - The client appears to the agency worker to have an undiagnosed mental health condition.
Health professional - The client has been diagnosed with a mental health condition by a doctor, nurse or other health professional.
Non-government agency - Information is received from a non-government agency who offers disability support programs, or from a local community support program, whose target population includes those with a mental illness.
Family/friends/carers - Family friends and carers are people who know the applicant well, and are concerned that the person may have an undiagnosed mental illness.
Self-identified - The client reports that they have a mental illness but does not have contact with a specialised mental health service or other relevant service providers at this point in time.
Other - There is information to indicate that the client has a mental health condition but the source of information is not included in the list above.
No information indicating mental illness - There is no information available to the agency worker to indicate that the client currently has a mental health condition. This does not necessarily mean that the client does not have a mental health issue, just that the worker does not have information to indicate that they do.
Not applicable - There is no consent for information to be provided to the AIHW.

Related Data Collection Standards
Aligns with SHIP

2.3.14 NDIS Package (Extended)

Description
Is the client receiving an NDIS package?

Format
Code: N
1. Yes, a current active plan
2. Yes, currently undergoing planning process
3. No, found not eligible
4. No, not accessed
99. Not stated/inadequately described
0. Not applicable

Guide for Use
N/A

Related Data Collection Standards
Developed by CSD

2.3.15 Aged Care Package (Extended)

Description
Is the client receiving an Aged Care Package?

Format
Code: N
1. Yes, a current active agreement
2. Yes, currently undergoing assessment
3. No, found not eligible
4. No, not accessed
99. Not stated/inadequately described
0. Not applicable

Guide for Use
N/A

Related Data Collection Standards
Developed by CSD

2.3.16 Support worker or carer (Extended)

Description
A marker nothing if the client requires a support worker or carer with them when accessing the service.

Format
Code: N
1.Yes
2.No
99. Not stated/inadequately described

Guide for Use
Code through drop-down options

Related Data Collection Standards
N/A

2.3.17 Support worker or carer (Extended)

Description
If yes is selected in 2.3.12 then provide contact details for support worker/carer (name, contact details).

Format
text X[X(45)]

Guide for Use
Code through drop-down options

Related Data Collection Standards
N/A

2.4.1 Highest level of education attained

Description
The highest level of education achieved by the client in relation to completed education, as represented by a code.

Format
Code: N
1. Postgraduate degree level
2. Graduate diploma and graduate certificate level
3. Bachelor degree level
4. Advanced diploma and diploma level
5. Certificate level
6. Senior secondary education (eg year 12)
7. Junior secondary education (eg year 10)
8. Primary education
9. Pre-primary education
10. Other education
11. No education
99. Not stated/inadequately described

Guide for Use
People should self-report their highest level of educational attainment by selecting a category from the following list of choices.

Related Data Collection Standards
AIHW-METeOR (identifier 321069, 2016) Person—level of highest educational attainment

2.4.2 Highest level of education attained - other (Extended)

Description
If ‘Other’ was selected in 2.4.1, then please specify.

Format
text X[X(45)]

Guide for Use
N/A.

Related Data Collection Standards
N/A

2.4.3 Student type (Extended)

Description
The type of education or training the client is currently enrolled in or undertaking, as represented by a code.

Format
Code: N
1. Preschool student
2. Primary school student
3. Secondary school student
4. University student
5. Vocational education and training
6. Other education or training
99. Don’t know
0. Not applicable

Guide for Use
Is the client currently enrolled in education?

Related Data Collection Standards
Aligns with SHIP

2.4.4 Student type- other (Extended)

Description
If ‘Other Education’ was selected in 2.4.3, then please specify.

Format
Text X[X(45)]

Guide for Use
N/A

Related Data Collection Standards
N/A

2.4.5 School attendance (Extended)

Description
The attendance status of a child or school age young person, as represented by a code.

Format
Code: N
1. Enrolled and attending school
2. Enrolled in school but not always attending
3. Enrolled in school but not attending
4. Enrolled in school but waiting to commence
5. Home schooled
6. Neither enrolled nor home schooled
99. Don’t know
0. Not applicable

Guide for Use
This data item will help to flag any potential risks if the client is a child and not attending school regularly.

Only complete for children aged between 4 and 18.

Related Data Collection Standards
Aligns with SHIP.

2.5.1 Veteran status

Description
Is the client currently serving or previously served in the Australian Defence Force?

Format
Code: N
1. Yes – currently serving
2. Yes – previously served
3. No
99. Not stated/inadequately described.

Guide for Use
Veteran definition: a person who is serving or who has served in the Australian Defence Force (as defined by Veterans Ministers Roundtable).

Related Data Collection Standards
Developed by CSD in response to outcome from Australia wide Veterans Ministers Roundtable.

2.6.1 Identify - other

Description
Any other details the client wants recorded to improve their service experience (e.g. Female client only wants female workers, history of mental health etc.).

Format
text X[X(500)]

Guide for Use
This can include mental health needs, pregnancy status, client history, religion/ethnicity/faith or any extra client information they think will improve their service experience.

Example question: Is there anything else you would like to tell us about how you identify in the world to help us ensure we link you in with appropriate services?

Related Data Collection Standards
N/A

3.1.1 Reason/trigger/event for need of service, intervention or assistance (Core)

Description
Presenting need or reason client gives for need of service, intervention or assistance.

This data element is intended to focus on the reason the client presented to the agency.

Format
Code: N
1. Financial difficulties
2. Housing affordability stress
3. Housing crisis
4. Inadequate or inappropriate dwelling conditions
5. Previous accommodation ended
6. Time out from family/other situation
7. Relationship/family breakdown
8. Sexual abuse
9. Domestic and family violence
10.Non-family violence
11.Mental health issues
12.Medical issues
13.Problematic drug or substance use
14.Problematic alcohol use
15.Employment difficulties
16.Unemployment
17.Problematic gambling
18.Transition from custodial arrangements
19.Transition from foster care and child safety residential placements
20.Transition from other care arrangements
21.Discrimination including racial and sexual
22.Itinerant
23.Unable to return home due to environmental reasons
24.Disengagement with school or other education and training
25.Lack of family and/or community support
26.Other
27.Child Protection
28.Youth Justice

Guide for Use
The collection of triggers for service is useful at entry to identify presenting needs.
This question could be asked in the following ways:
‘Tell us why you are applying for social housing assistance?
‘Why is this referral being made? What are main areas of concern for family?
‘Are there things that make it harder for your family to get help you need?’

If service trigger is a family violence episode then this can be further recorded at data item 3.5 N.B. The assessment of service impact is in section 5.

Definitions:
Financial difficulties: The client sought assistance because they had insufficient money to pay for accommodation, food, bills or other essentials. The client has adequate financial resources but has difficulties managing these resources. The client doesn’t have the financial resources to meet rental commitments.

Housing affordability stress: The client sought assistance as a result of the current rent on the leased property being too high. The client is having difficulty meeting mortgage repayments, creating stress with general living expenses.

Housing crisis: The client was formally evicted from their previous accommodation arrangement (for example, by a landlord or public housing official). The client was asked to leave their previous accommodation (for example, they were asked to leave by flatmates).

Inadequate or inappropriate dwelling conditions: The client sought assistance as a result of household stress from overcrowded, unsuitable or unsafe dwelling conditions.
Previous accommodation ended: The client’s previous accommodation was no longer available (for example, the break-up of a group home r rental property being sold by owner).

Time out from family/other situation: The client needed some time away from their family or needed some time away from non-related individuals.

Relationship/family breakdown: The client sought assistance because of the dissolution of a spouse/partner relationship or other family relationship.

Sexual abuse: The client sought assistance as a result of sexual abuse inflicted on the client by a family member or non-related individual.

Domestic and family violence: The client sought assistance as a result of physical or emotional abuse inflicted on the client by a family member.

Non-family violence: The client sought assistance as a result of physical or emotional abuse inflicted on the client by a non-related individual. The client sought assistance as a result of violence or a threat of violence inflicted by a non-related individual.

Mental health issues: The client sought assistance because of a mental health issue. This does not include a situation in which the client sought assistance as a result of another person’s mental health issues.

Medical issues: The client sought assistance because of any conditions that are, or have been, treated or diagnosed by a health professional.

Problematic drug or substance use: The client sought assistance as a result of their drug-related problem. This does not include a situation in which the client sought assistance as a result of drug abuse by another person.

Problematic alcohol use: The client sought assistance as a result of their alcohol-related problem. This does not include a situation in which the client sought assistance as a result of alcohol use by another person.

Employment difficulties: The client is experiencing difficulties or changes to their employment that negatively impact on their ability to work or on their life outside work. Includes cases where employment difficulties are creating current or future financial problems, such as: difficulty maintaining employment; recently losing employment, or a change in employment conditions, such as reduction in pay/hours and so forth; bullying or harassment; unsafe employment conditions (that is, health safety risks); or unfair or illegal workplace practices/conditions (such as excessive workload, inflexible hours).

Unemployment: The client sought assistance because of difficulties obtaining or maintaining employment and is currently unemployed.

Problematic gambling: The client was homeless or sought assistance because they had insufficient means to cover the cost of living as a consequence of a one-off instance or an ongoing gambling problem.

Transition from custodial arrangements: The client was recently released from a custodial institution such as a prison or detention centre.

Transition from foster care/child safety residential placements: Child safety placements include a range of services provided to children and young people under 18 who are in need of care and protection. This service provides alternative overnight accommodation for children and young people who are unable to live with their parents. These arrangements include foster care, placements with relatives or kin, and residential care.

Transition from other care arrangements: The client was recently released from a care institution such as a hospital or disability care arrangement.

Discrimination, including racial and sexual discrimination: The client was homeless or sought assistance because of discrimination based on their sex, age, race, religion or other personal attributes.

Itinerant: The client was moving from place to place or had no fixed address.
Unable to return home due to environmental reasons: The client is unable to return home due to environmental reasons (for example, wet season flooding, bushfires).

Disengagement with school or other education and training: The client sought assistance because of their difficulty with engaging within their education of training, creating difficulties for the clients to establish connection with community and develop skills that will help them find future employment.

Lack of family and/or community support: The client has no family or community support structure and this has led them to seek agency support.

Other: The client sought assistance for a reason not included above, for example:– as a result of their sexuality or sexual identification – they recently arrived in the area (from another town or another country) and had nowhere to stay.

Child protection:
Youth justice:
Don’t know: The information is not known or the client has refused to provide the information.

Related Data Collection Standards
Aligns with SHIP.
Items 27 and 28 added for CSD

3.2.1 Main source of client income (Extended)

Description
The main source from which a client derives the greatest proportion of their income, as represented by a code.

Format
Code: N
1. Newstart allowance
2. Parenting payment
3. Disability support pension (Centrelink)
4. Youth allowance
5. Age pension
6. Austudy/ABSTUDY
7. DVA pension or payment
8. Sickness allowance
9. Carer allowance
10. Carer Payment
11. Other government pensions and allowances
12. Employee income
13. Unincorporated business income
14. Other income
15. Nil income
99. Don’t know
99. Don’t know

Guide for Use
If 11 (Other government pensions and allowances) is chosen, then complete 3.2.2.

This item refers to the source by which a client derives most (equal to or greater than 50%) of person’s income. If the client has multiple sources of income and none are equal to or greater than 50%, the one which contributes the largest percentage should be counted.

Related Data Collection Standards
Aligns with SHIP

3.2.2 Other - government pensions and allowances

Description
If ‘Other government pensions and allowances’ was selected in 3.2.1 then specify the name of assistance the client receives.

Format
text X[X(45)]

Guide for Use
N/A

Related Data Collection Standards
N/A

3.3.1 Type of residence/dwelling the client lives in when presenting at service (Extended)

Description
The type of physical accommodation the client is currently residing in during service interaction (e.g. private residence, supported living facility, acute hospital, prison) as represented by a code.

A client’s housing status includes, but is not limited to, owning their residence, having a mortgage, renting or staying with a friend or relative.

Format
Code: N
1. House/townhouse/flat
2. Caravan
3. Tent
4. Cabin
5. Boat
6. Improvised building/dwelling
7. No dwelling/street/park/in the open
8. Motor vehicle
9. Boarding/rooming house
10. Emergency accommodation
11. Hotel/motel/bed and breakfast
12. Hospital (excluding psychiatric)
13. Psychiatric hospital/unit
14. Disability support
15. Rehabilitation
16. Adult correctional facility
17. Youth/juvenile justice correctional centre
18. Boarding school/residential college
19. Aged care facility
20. Immigration detention centre
21. Other
99. Don't know

Guide for Use
Definitions:
House/townhouse/flat: Includes bedsits, and flats attached to houses or shops and so forth.
Caravan: All mobile units on land occupied on a permanent or semi-permanent basis by people. Includes caravans, campervans and mobile houses.
Tent: Includes all portable shelters made of canvas or fabric, supported by one or more poles or a frame.
Cabin: Includes small houses or shelters of simple construction. 56 Specialist Homelessness Services Collection manual
Boat: All mobile water units occupied on a permanent or semi-permanent basis. Includes small boats and houseboats.
Improvised building/dwelling: Includes a structure or building not intended for the purpose of housing people.
No dwelling/street/park/in the open: Includes those people who are sleeping on public transport, such as riding on trains/buses and so forth, because they have no other option.
Motor vehicle: Includes all road vehicles that are not equipped for living in. Excludes campervans, caravans and mobile houses.
Boarding/rooming house: Includes self-contained units within a boarding house with separate cooking, bathroom, and toilet facilities. This refers to the individual rooms in a boarding/rooming house, not the complete building.
Emergency accommodation: Includes night shelters/women’s refuges/youth shelters. Hotel/motel/bed and breakfast: Includes all commercial establishments that provide paid lodging, and usually meals and other guest services.
Hospital (excluding psychiatric): Includes hospitals and other health-care facilities but not specialised prison health facilities.
Psychiatric hospital/unit: Includes mental health units and forensic health units of corrective services systems.
Disability support: Includes all units whose primary role is disability support.
Rehabilitation: Includes facilities that cater for drug and alcohol rehabilitation. Excludes rehabilitation in prisons and correctional facilities.
Adult correctional facility (prison): Includes those facilities whose main role is to detain and rehabilitate adult prisoners.
Youth/juvenile justice correctional centre: Includes those facilities whose main role is to detain and rehabilitate youth or juveniles. Community custodial facilities are included in this category. Specialist Homelessness Services Collection manual 57.
Boarding school/residential college: Includes educational institutions where students reside during the academic year.
Aged care facility: Refers to nursing homes, aged care hostels or non-self-contained accommodation for the aged. Immigration detention centre. Includes immigration residential housing and immigration transit accommodation.
Other:  Refers to a type of dwelling that is not listed in the categories above.
Don’t know: The information is not known or the client has refused to provide the information.

Related Data Collection Standards
Aligns with SHIP

3.3.2 Housing tenure

Description
A description of a client's legal right to occupy a dwelling in which he/she lives, as represented by a code.

Format
Code: N
1. Renter - private housing
2. Renter - public housing
3. Renter - community housing
4. Renter - transitional housing
5. Renter - caravan park
6. Renter - boarding/rooming house
7. Renter - emergency accommodation/night shelter/women's refuge/youth shelter where rent is charged
8. Other renter
9. Rent free - private housing
10. Rent free - public housing
11. Rent free - community housing
12. Rent free - transitional housing
13. Rent free - caravan park
14. Rent free - boarding/rooming house
15. Rent free - emergency accommodation/night shelter/women's refuge/youth shelter where rent is not charged
16. Other rent free
17. Life tenure scheme
18. Owner - shared equity or rent/buy scheme
19. Owner - being purchased/with mortgage
20. Owner - fully owned
21. Other tenure type not elsewhere specified
22. No tenure
99. Don't know

Guide for Use
Code through drop-down options.
Response definitions:
Renter—private housing A client renting a dwelling owned by a private individual(s) or a private business. It is NOT owned by a government body or a housing association, housing cooperative or other not-for-profit community service organisation.
Renter—public housing A client renting a dwelling owned/controlled by a government body or government authority.
Renter—community housing A client renting a dwelling owned/controlled by a housing association, housing cooperative or other not-for-profit community service organisation.
Renter—transitional housing A client renting accommodation provided through a government-funded agency. The accommodation is generally more stable and provided for longer than crisis accommodation, and is linked to external support through an agency.
Renter—caravan park A client renting a cabin or caravan in a caravan park.
Renter—boarding/rooming house A client renting a room or rooms in a boarding or rooming house.
Renter—emergency accommodation/night shelter/women’s refuge/youth shelter A client paying rent for emergency accommodation, a night shelter, women’s refuge or youth refuge.
Other renterA client renting accommodation that is not included in the categories listed above.
Rent free—private housing A client staying rent free at a dwelling owned by a private individual(s) or a private business. It is NOT owned by a government body or a housing association, housing cooperative or other not-for-profit community service organisation.
Rent free—public housing A client staying rent free at a dwelling owned/controlled by a government body or government authority.
Rent free—community housing A client staying rent free at a dwelling owned/controlled by a housing association, housing cooperative or other not-for-profit community service organisation.
Rent free—transitional housing A client staying rent free at accommodation provided through a government-funded agency. The accommodation is generally more stable and provided for longer than crisis accommodation, and is linked to external support through an agency.
Rent free—Caravan Park A client staying rent free in a cabin or caravan in a caravan park.
Rent free—boarding/rooming house A client staying rent free in a room or rooms in a boarding or rooming house.
Rent free—emergency accommodation/night shelter/women’s refuge/youth shelter A client staying rent free in emergency accommodation, a night shelter, women’s refuge or youth refuge.
Other rent free A client staying rent free at accommodation that is not included in the categories listed above.
Life tenure scheme A client with a contract to live in the dwelling for the term of their life but without the full rights of ownership and usually with limited or no equity in the dwelling. This is a common arrangement in retirement villages.
Owner—shared equity or rent/buy scheme A client who is purchasing a proportion of the equity in the dwelling, and paying rent for the remainder.
Owner—being purchased/with mortgage The client owns their dwelling and is repaying a mortgage or loans secured against the dwelling, regardless of the purpose of the mortgage or secured loan.
Owner—fully owned The client owns their dwelling and is not making any payments on mortgages or loans secured against the dwelling. A client who has repaid a loan, but technically not discharged the associated mortgage, is included in this category.
Other tenure type not elsewhere specified A client with tenure that does not fit any of the above categories. Includes clients who are house-sitting or receiving payment in kind for a specific service, such as live-in nanny.
No tenure The client is sleeping rough or does not have a legal right to occupy a dwelling and can be asked to leave at any time. Includes couch surfing, living on the streets, sleeping in parks, squatting, using cars or railway carriages, improvised dwellings, or living in the long grass. Includes living in an institutional setting, such as a hospital, psychiatric hospital/unit, disability support unit, rehabilitation facility, adult correctional facility, youth/juvenile justice correctional centre, boarding school/residential college, aged care facility or immigration detention centre.
Don’t know The information is not known or the client has refused to provide the information.

Related Data Collection Standards
Aligns with SHIP

3.4.1 Personal support network (Extended)

Description
The client’s formal support network (e.g., services including GP, school, psychologist, social worker).

Format
text X[X(500)]

Guide for Use
N/A

Related Data Collection Standards
N/A

3.4.2 Formal support network (Extended)

Description
The client’s informal or personal support network (e.g. family, neighbours, friends).

Format
text X[X(500)]

Guide for Use
N/A

Related Data Collection Standards
N/A

3.4.3 Dependents (Extended)

Description
The ‘Dependents’ data item is used to determine if a client has dependents (i.e. children / ageing parents). If yes, how many and their ages.

Format
Code: N

Couple family with:
0. No dependent children
1. One dependent child
2. Two dependent children
3. Three dependent children
4. Four dependant children
5. Five dependent children
6. Six or more dependent children

One parent family with:
7. No dependent children
8. One dependent child
9. Two dependent children
10. Three dependent children
11. Four dependent children
12. Five dependent children
13. Six or more dependent children

Adult dependents:
14. One dependent adult
15. Two dependent adults
16. Three or more dependent adults

0. Not applicable

Guide for Use
Dependency is assumed to exist when an individual living in a family household is likely to be unable to support themselves financially and is therefore reliant on another usually resident individual(s) for the provision of their financial or daily support needs (meals, accommodation, and other expenses).

Definitions:
Dependent child: A dependent child is a person who is either a child under 15 years of age, or a dependent student (see Dependent student below). To be regarded as a child the person can have no identified partner or child of his/her own usually resident in the household.

Dependent adult: A dependent adult is a person living in the family household who is unable to support themselves financially and is dependent for their financial or daily support needs (meals, accommodation, and other expenses).

Related Data Collection Standards
Based on ABS - Census Dictionary, 2016 (cat. no. 2901.0)'CDCF: Count of Dependent Children in Family'.
Adult dependents developed by CSD.

3.4.4 Number of people requiring the service (Extended)

Description
The total number of people or clients receiving services in a service event.

Format
Person – number of people seeking service, total N

Guide for Use
Drop down menu coding 1-20.

If more than 1 then loop will be created for following numbers so that each will answer 3.4.5, 3.4.6, 3.4.7.

Depending on number presented in 3.4.6 then this loop will be processed for each client. The system will assume the first is always the client the form is being filled for with preceding numbers as accompanying clients (i.e. if there are 5 people presenting for service then first is client in this data form with 4 accompanying).

Related Data Collection Standards
AIHW – METeOR – Service event—number of clients receiving services

3.4.5 Relationship of other presenting clients to presenting unit head (Extended)

Description
The relationship of a person within the presenting unit to the client from the unit who is the most actively engaged with the episode of service, intervention or assistance, as represented by a code.

Format
Code: N
Drop down menu for coding
1. Self
2. Spouse/partner
3. Parent/Guardian
4. Child
5. Step child
6. Foster child
7. Sibling
8. Aunt or uncle
9. Niece or nephew
10. Grandparent
11. Grandchild
12. Other relative
13. Unrelated person
14. Unrelated flatmate or co-tenant
15. Other relationship
99. Don’t know

Guide for Use
Self: A client presents by themselves. The client is the presenting unit head.
Spouse/partner: A client has a relationship to the presenting unit head akin to a ‘married’ or ‘partner’ relationship. This includes same sex couples.
Parent/guardian: The client is the parent or guardian of the presenting unit head.
Child: The client is a natural or adopted child, or ward, of the presenting unit head.
Step child: The client is the step child of the presenting unit head.
Foster child: The client is the foster child of the presenting unit head.
Sibling: The client is either the brother or sister of the presenting unit head.
Aunt or uncle: The client is either the aunt or uncle of the presenting unit head.
Niece or nephew: The client is either the niece or nephew of the presenting unit head.
Grandparent: The client is a grandparent of the presenting unit head.
Grandchild: The client is the grandchild of the presenting unit head.
Other relative: The client is a more distant relative to the presenting unit head; for example, cousin or second cousin.
Unrelated person: If the client is unrelated to the presenting unit head but is a flatmate or co-tenant, record them in the category Unrelated flatmate or co-tenant. The client accompanying the presenting unit head is not related to them. Includes those clients who are friends of the presenting unit head.
Unrelated flatmate or co-tenant: The client is not related to the presenting unit head and is either a flatmate or co-tenant with the presenting unit head.
Other relationship: The client has another type of relationship to the presenting unit head that has not been described above. Specify the relationship in the space provided—use upper case (capital) letters.

Related Data Collection Standards
Aligns with SHIP

3.4.6 Relationship of other presenting clients – other relationship (Extended)

Description
If other is selected in 3.4.5, please provide details.

Format
text X[X(500)]

Guide for Use
N/A

Related Data Collection Standards
N/A

3.4.7 Other presenting clients details (Extended)

Description
Full name, address, DOB, and gender details of other clients needing service.

Format
Loop back to complete all of Data Group 1. Identification.

Guide for Use
Loop back to complete all of Data Group 1. Identification.

Related Data Collection Standards
N/A

3.4.8 Household composition (Extended)

Description
A marker indicating whether the client usually resides alone or with others, and their relationship to others in the household, as represented by a code.

Format
Code N:
1. Lone person
2. One parent with child or children
3. Couple with child or children
4. Couple without children
5. Other family
6. Group
99.Don’t know

Guide for Use
The 'Household composition' classification is designed to classify all households within all private dwellings in Australia.

Lone person: The client lives alone. This includes living alone (without family) in an institution.
One parent with child(ren): The client is a single parent living with their child(ren). The client is a child living with a single parent. Includes step and adopted parent/child relationships.
Couple with child(ren): The client is a parent living with their spouse/partner and their child(ren). The client is a child living with both parents. Includes step and adopted parent/child relationships.
Couple without child(ren): The client is living with their spouse/partner only.
Other family: Includes all other groups with related individuals, including siblings and families of more than two generations.
Group: Includes two or more unrelated persons who live together. Situations where boarders or lodgers live with a family. Excludes persons living alone (without family) in institutions.

Don’t know: Where you are unable to determine the living arrangements of the client

Related Data Collection Standards
Aligns with SHIP

3.4.9 Number of people in household (Extended)

Description
Number of people currently living in client’s household.

Format
Number of people currently living in persons household, total N[N]

Guide for Use
Drop down menu coding 1-20.

Related Data Collection Standards
N/A

3.5.1 Domestic and family violence indicator (Core)

Description
A marker indicating if client is experiencing or committing family, domestic and/or sexual violence. This includes the following: physical violence or abuse; sexual violence or abuse; emotional or psychological abuse; economic abuse; threatening behaviour; coercion or any other behaviour that controls or dominates and/or causes someone to feel fear for their safety or wellbeing of the family member or another person.  

Services may need to ask direct questions about a client’s sense of safety in relationships to determine whether domestic violence is present.

Format
Code: N
1. Yes - experiencing violence
2. Yes - using violence
3. Yes - experiencing and using violence
4. No - not experiencing or using violence
99. Not stated/inadequately described

Guide for Use
Code through drop-down options. 
It is recommended that this item be sensitively applied within the service’s business processes. For instance, this may be captured within a holistic risk screening or assessment tool.

Note: the definition of violence used in this data item is provided by the Family Violence Act 2016.

Note: experiencing violence includes witnessing family, domestic and/or sexual violence.

Related Data Collection Standards
N/A

3.5.2 Type/s of domestic and family violence (Extended)

Description
This data item captures information about the type (or types) of violent behaviour that was experienced by a client during the most recent event of family, domestic and sexual violence (for example, physical, verbal or sexual assault, threatening behaviour, stalking, psychological and economic abuse). 

Format
Code: N
1. Physical violence or abuse
2. Sexual violence or abuse
3. Emotional or psychological abuse
4. Economic abuse
5. Threatening behaviour
6. Coercion, control, intimidation, isolation or domination
99. Not stated/inadequately described

Guide for Use
Code through drop-down options, allow for multiple selection.

Definitions sourced from the ABS 4906.0.55.003 - Personal Safety Survey, Australia: User Guide, 2012

  1. Physical violence or abuse – involves the use of physical force with the intent to harm or frighten a person.
  2. Sexual violence or abuse – an act of a sexual nature carried out against a person’s will through the use of physical force, intimidation or coercion, and includes any attempts to do this.
  3. Emotional or psychological abuse - Constantly insulted them to make them feel ashamed, belittled or humiliated.
  4. Economic abuse - Stopped or tried to stop them knowing about or having access to household money; stopped or tried to stop them from working or earning money; stopped or tried to stop them from studying; damaged, destroyed or stole any of their property.
  5. Threatening behaviour - Threatened to take their child/ren away from them; threatened to harm their child/ren; threatened to harm other family members or friends; threatened to harm any of their pets; harmed any of their pets; threatened or tried to commit suicide.

Coercion, control, intimidation, isolation or domination - Stopped or tried to stop them from contacting family, friends or community; stopped or tried to stop them from using the telephone, Internet or family car; monitored their whereabouts (e.g. constant phone calls); controlled or tried to control where they went or who they saw; deprived them of basic needs such as food, shelter, sleep or assistive aids; lied to their child/ren with the intent of turning them against them; lied to other family members or friends with the intent of turning them against them.

Related Data Collection Standards
Standard is specified for this data item.
Adapted from SHIP code used in item 3.4.5.

3.5.3 Relationship between perpetrator and client (Extended)

Description
This data item assesses the type of relationship that exists between a perpetrator who committed violence, the client and any other person (or persons) involved or present at an event (directly involved or witness to the event). This includes but is not limited to: family, friends, housemates or acquaintances.

Format
1. Spouse/partner
2. Parent/Guardian
3. Child
4. Step child
5. Foster child
6. Sibling
7. Aunt or uncle
8. Niece or nephew
9. Grandparent
10. Grandchild
11. Other relative
12. Unrelated person
13. Unrelated flatmate or co-tenant
14. Other relationship
99. Don’t know

Guide for Use
Code through drop-down options

The client should be asked to nominate their relationship to all parties who were present at the event from a pre-determined list of responses. The types of relationships recorded may differ depending on the nature of the recording agency.

Spouse/partner: A client has a relationship to the presenting unit head akin to a ‘married’ or ‘partner’ relationship. This includes same sex couples.
Parent/guardian: The client is the parent or guardian of the presenting unit head.
Child: The client is a natural or adopted child, or ward, of the presenting unit head.
Step child: The client is the step child of the presenting unit head.
Foster child: The client is the foster child of the presenting unit head.
Sibling: The client is either the brother or sister of the presenting unit head.
Aunt or uncle: The client is either the aunt or uncle of the presenting unit head.
Niece or nephew: The client is either the niece or nephew of the presenting unit head.
Grandparent: The client is a grandparent of the presenting unit head.
Grandchild: The client is the grandchild of the presenting unit head.
Other relative: The client is a more distant relative to the presenting unit head; for example, cousin or second cousin.
Unrelated person: If the client is unrelated to the presenting unit head but is a flatmate or co-tenant, record them in the category Unrelated flatmate or co-tenant. The client accompanying the presenting unit head is not related to them. Includes those clients who are friends of the presenting unit head.
Unrelated flatmate or co-tenant: The client is not related to the presenting unit head and is either a flatmate or co-tenant with the presenting unit head.
Other relationship: The client has another type of relationship to the presenting unit head that has not been described above. Specify the relationship in the space provided—use upper case (capital) letters.

Related Data Collection Standards
Standard is specified for this data item.
Adapted from SHIP code used in item 3.4.5.

3.5.4 Relationship between person experiencing violence and client

Description
This data item assesses the type of relationship that exists between a client who committed violence, the person experiencing violence and any other person (or persons) involved or present at an event (directly involved or witness to the event). This includes but is not limited to: family, friends, housemates or acquaintances.

Format
1. Spouse/partner
2. Parent/Guardian
3. Child
4. Step child
5. Foster child
6. Sibling
7. Aunt or uncle
8. Niece or nephew
9. Grandparent
10. Grandchild
11. Other relative
12. Unrelated person
13. Unrelated flatmate or co-tenant
14. Other relationship
99. Don’t know

Guide for Use
Code through drop-down options

The client should be asked to nominate their relationship to all parties who were present at the event from a pre-determined list of responses. The types of relationships recorded may differ depending on the nature of the recording agency.

Spouse/partner: A client has a relationship to the presenting unit head akin to a ‘married’ or ‘partner’ relationship. This includes same sex couples.
Parent/guardian: The client is the parent or guardian of the presenting unit head.
Child: The client is a natural or adopted child, or ward, of the presenting unit head.
Step child: The client is the step child of the presenting unit head.
Foster child: The client is the foster child of the presenting unit head.
Sibling: The client is either the brother or sister of the presenting unit head.
Aunt or uncle: The client is either the aunt or uncle of the presenting unit head.
Niece or nephew: The client is either the niece or nephew of the presenting unit head.
Grandparent: The client is a grandparent of the presenting unit head.
Grandchild: The client is the grandchild of the presenting unit head.
Other relative: The client is a more distant relative to the presenting unit head; for example, cousin or second cousin.
Unrelated person: If the client is unrelated to the presenting unit head but is a flatmate or co-tenant, record them in the category Unrelated flatmate or co-tenant. The client accompanying the presenting unit head is not related to them. Includes those clients who are friends of the presenting unit head.
Unrelated flatmate or co-tenant: The client is not related to the presenting unit head and is either a flatmate or co-tenant with the presenting unit head.
Other relationship: The client has another type of relationship to the presenting unit head that has not been described above. Specify the relationship in the space provided—use upper case (capital) letters.

Related Data Collection Standards
Standard is specified for this data item.
Adapted from SHIP code used in item 3.4.5.

3.5.5 Relationship between parties - other (Extended)

Description
If ‘Other relationship’ was selected in 3.5.3, or 3.5.4 then provide free text option.

Format
Text X[X(45)]

Guide for Use
N/A

Related Data Collection Standards
N/A

3.5.6 Personal and family safety Extended)

Description
This item is to capture any safety or harm concerns the client may be experiencing for themselves, their family or their friends. This can include: domestic violence, mental illness, alcohol and drugs, behaviours, housing situations etc.

Format
text X[X(500)]

Guide for Use
This item is used to record service users’ reported feelings and experience of harm or risk of harm; including whether they are and feel safe in their families, homes and the community.

It is recommended that this item is also used to record whether the service user is engaged in or at risk of being a perpetrator of violence/offending and/or re-offending.

Related Data Collection Standards
N/A

3.6.1 Changes in personal circumstance (Extended)

Description
Recent or imminent changes to the client's circumstances, such as pregnancy, birth of a child, care changes for a child or dependent, separation, partnering, becoming homeless, becoming unemployed.

Format
text X[X(500)]

Guide for Use
Records should be updated for customers’ changes in personal circumstances to ensure accuracy and appropriate service provision.

Related Data Collection Standards
N/A

3.6.2 Date of circumstance change (Extended)

Description
The date changes mentioned in 3.6.1

Format
Circumstance change date, expressed as DDMMYYYY Y

Guide for Use
It is suggested that automated calendar selection tools be used rather than free text.

Related Data Collection Standards
N/A

4.1.1 Date service started (Core)

Description
The date on which an episode of service, intervention or assistance commenced.

Format
Service episode — episode start date, DDMMYYYY

Guide for Use
It is suggested that automated calendar selection tools be used rather than free text.
Where possible use automated data stamp.

Related Data Collection Standards
AIHW – METeOR – Service Episode—episode start date

4.1.2 Date service episode (Core)

Description
This data item captures information about the day, month and year in which the transaction between an individual and an organisation provider occurred. This may be recorded in the form of a start and/or end date of transaction.

Format
Service episode — episode contact date, DDMMYYYY

Multiple transaction dates may be recorded for a person. The ‘Date of Transaction’ should be recorded in conjunction with a unique identifier, or ‘Linkage Key', to produce outputs about the number of transactions between a client and an organisation.

Guide for Use
It is suggested that automated calendar selection tools be used rather than free text.
Where possible use automated data stamp.

Related Data Collection Standards
AIHW – METeOR Service Contact – Service Contact Date

4.1.3 Date changes assessed (Extended)

Description
The date an episode of service, intervention or assistance was assessed for changes, improvements or otherwise. This is usually linked to the measures of changes against goal attainment, changes in circumstances, identified need and trigger for episode of service, intervention or assistance.

Format
Service episode — episode change date, DDMMYYYY

Guide for Use
It is suggested that automated calendar selection tools be used rather than free text.
Where possible use automated data stamp.

Related Data Collection Standards
N/A

4.1.4 Date service ended (Core)

Description
The date on which an episode of service, intervention or assistance was completed.

Format
Service episode — episode end date, DDMMYYYY

Guide for Use
It is suggested that automated calendar selection tools be used rather than free text.
Where possible use automated data stamp.

Related Data Collection Standards
AIHW – METeOR – Service episode—episode end date

4.2.1 Source of client referral to this agency (Core)

Description
Where was the client referred from?

Format
code N:
Drop down menu for coding
1. Specialist Homelessness Agency/outreach worker
2. Telephone/crisis referral agency
3. Centrelink or employment service case worker
4. Child protection agency
5. Family and child support agency
6. Hospital
7. Mental health service
8. Disability support service
9. Drug and alcohol service
10. Aged care service
11. Social housing
12. Youth/juvenile justice correctional centre
13. Adult correctional facility
14. Legal unit (including legal aid)
15. School/other education institution
16. Police
17. Courts
18. Immigration department or asylum seeker/refugee support service
19. Other agency (government or non-government)
20. Family and/or friends
21. Other
22. No formal referral/self referral
99. Don’t know

Guide for Use
Code through drop-down options.
How did the client know to come to your service? What was the referral source? 

This is collected because:

  • It indicates how the client was referred to your agency.
  • It is used to provide information about the links between specialist homelessness services and other parts of the welfare, corrective services and health systems.

How to complete

  • Formal referral means that another person, group or organisation contacted the agency on behalf of the client. This may include a letter which the client presented to the agency.
  • Select the source of formal referral from the list.
Select Self referral if there was no contact from another person, group or organisation on behalf of the client.

Related Data Collection Standards
Aligns with SHIP

4.2.2 Source of client referral - other (Extended)

Description
If 'other' is selected from 'sector client referred from' (4.2.1) then provide further details.

Format
text X[X(500)]

Guide for Use
N/A

Related Data Collection Standards
N/A

4.2.3 Organisation type referred to (Core)

Description
The organisation type that the client is being referred to, as represented by a code.

Format
Code N:
Drop down menu for coding
1. Specialist Homelessness Agency/outreach worker
2. Telephone/crisis referral agency
3. Centrelink or employment service case worker
4. Child protection agency
5. Family and child support agency
6. Hospital
7. Mental health service
8. Disability support service
9. Drug and alcohol service
10. Aged care service
11. Social housing
12. Youth/juvenile justice correctional centre
13. Adult correctional facility
14. Legal unit (including legal aid)
15. School/other education institution
16. Police
17. Courts
18. Immigration department or asylum seeker/refugee support service
19. Other agency (government or non-government)
20. Family and/or friends
99. Other

Guide for Use
Where is the client being referred to? – only complete if this is relevant.

Related Data Collection Standards
N/A

4.2.4 Organisation type referred to - other (Extended)

Description
If 'other' is selected in 4.2.3, please provide further details.

Format
text X[X(500)]

Guide for Use
N/A

Related Data Collection Standards
N/A

4.2.5 Organisation client is being referred to (Core)

Description
The organisation name client is being referred to.

Format
text X[X(500)]

Guide for Use
N/A

Related Data Collection Standards
N/A

4.2.6 Worker at organisation client is being referred to (Extended)

Description
The name of the worker at the organisation the client is being referred to.

Format
text X[X(500)]

Guide for Use
N/A

Related Data Collection Standards
N/A

4.2.7 Organisation telephone number client is being referred to (Core)

Description
The number, used as a contact method, which is associated to a unique provision of telephone service, as represented by text.

Format
X[X(15)]

Guide for Use
N/A

Related Data Collection Standards
N/A