In a life threatening emergency dial Triple Zero (000)

In a life threatening emergency dial Triple Zero (000)
ACT Public Hospitals

Canberra Hospital

5124 0000


Calvary Hospital

6201 6111

Mental Health

Call Mental Health Triage on

1800 629 354

(free call except from mobiles or public phones) or

6205 1065

Poisons Hotline

For a poison emergency in Australia call

131126

Drug and Alcohol Help Line

The Drug and Alcohol Help Line is available 24-hours, 7 days a week on

5124 9977

Health Protection Service

For after hours urgent public health matters including environmental health, radiation safety, food poisoning and communicable disease management phone:

(02) 6205 1700

healthdirect

24 hour health advice

1800 022 222

ACT State Emergency Service

Emergency help
during flood or storms

132 500


Young People in Youth Justice Facilities


Indicator  description

Young people for whom the police or ACT courts have made a decision for a period of detention.

What do we  measure?

The number of young people who were admitted for at least one period of detention at Bimberi Youth Justice Centre during the financial year.

Why is this important?

Young people who have been charged or convicted of a criminal offence may be ordered by the court (or police) to be detained, which provides safe and secure accommodation, facilitates rehabilitation and promotes the reintegration of young people into the community through a range of programs and services.50

Research shows that any period of detention at a justice facility can have negative implications for the life of a young person in areas such as education, employment and personal relationships.51 More significantly, a period of detention may draw the young person further into the justice system and develop negative peer relationships and attitudes towards themselves and the community.

Policy Context

Since the introduction of the Blueprint, there has been a significant decline in the number of young people in detention. This trend shows that fewer young people are entering or coming into contact with the youth justice system.

Since 2011-12, the number of young people in detention at Bimberi has decreased. Between 2015-16 and 2016-17, the number of young people in detention remained consistent. The significant decrease in preceding years demonstrates the ACT Government's commitment to providing early intervention and prevention initiatives for young people, which support the achievement of the Blueprint (i.e. reducing and maintaining the reduction of young people in detention).

Young people in detention at Bimberi are supported to maintain engagement in education, build and maintain family ties and develop the life skills they need to reintegrate successfully in the community.

How is the ACT Progressing?

Source: AIHW Youth Justice in Australia, 2016-17, Table S84b.

Note Trend data may differ from those previously published due to data revisions.

The data (in Figure 34) demonstrates a downward trend in the number of young people in detention in the ACT, from 90 non-Aboriginal and 44 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people in 2011-12. This decreased by more than 55 per cent in 2016-17 to 50 non-Aboriginal and 29 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people.

Source: AIHW 2017, Youth Justice in Australia, 2016-17, Table S90b.

Note Trend data may differ from those previously published due to data revisions.

There were more young men than young women experiencing detention in the ACT (Figure 35) and this is consistent nationally where approximately 82 per cent of detainees are young men.

Table 39: Number of ACT young people in detention by age, 2013-17

Age

2013-14

2014-15

2015-16

2016-17

10 years

0

0

0

0

11 years

0

2

0

0

12 years

1

0

4

3

13 years

2

5

2

5

14 years

8

11

12

13

15 years

19

15

13

13

16 years

20

18

18

21

17 years

25

26

19

19

18 years+

13

14

10

5

Total 10–17 years

75

77

68

74

Source: AIHW 2017, Youth Justice in Australia, 2016-17, Table S74b.

Note Trend data may differ from those previously published due to data revisions. Age calculated as at start of financial year if first period of detention in the relevant year began before the start of the financial year, otherwise age calculated as at start of first period of detention in the relevant year. Legislation requires that the offence giving rise to youth justice involvement be committed while a young person is aged between 10-17 years. However, youth justice involvement may continue with these young people after they reach adulthood. In the ACT the upper age limit for youth justice involvement is 21 years.

Table 40: Average number of days young people in the ACT spent in detention by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status, 2012-17

  

2012-13

2013-14

2014-15

2015-16

2016-17

Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander

Male

74

80

54

57

18

Female

26

78

20

20

42

Total

67

80

41

44

23

Non-Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander

Male

76

79

46

46

54

Female

19

23

12

16

18

Total

63

65

38

39

45

All young people

Male

76

80

49

49

40

 

Female

20

38

15

18

26

 

Total

64

69

39

40

37

Source: AIHW 2017, Youth Justice in Australia, 2016-17, table S104.

50 ACT Government 2016, A Picture of ACT’s Children and Young People 2016.
51 ACT Government 2012, Blueprint for Youth Justice in the ACT 2012–22, p.12.