In a life threatening emergency dial Triple Zero (000)

In a life threatening emergency dial Triple Zero (000)
ACT Public Hospitals

Canberra Hospital

5124 0000


Calvary Hospital

6201 6111

Mental Health

Call Mental Health Triage on

1800 629 354

(free call except from mobiles or public phones) or

6205 1065

Poisons Hotline

For a poison emergency in Australia call

131126

Drug and Alcohol Help Line

The Drug and Alcohol Help Line is available 24-hours, 7 days a week on

5124 9977

Health Protection Service

For after hours urgent public health matters including environmental health, radiation safety, food poisoning and communicable disease management phone:

(02) 6205 1700

healthdirect

24 hour health advice

1800 022 222

ACT State Emergency Service

Emergency help
during flood or storms

132 500


Young People under Community-Based Supervision


Indicator  description

Young people for whom the ACT courts have made a decision for a period of supervision by the Director-General, Community Services Directorate, which is to be served in the community.

What do we  measure?

The number of young people under community-based supervision.

Why is this  important?

Young people who have been charged or convicted of a criminal offence may be ordered by the court to be supervised in the community. These young people are provided support and supervision with the aim of addressing their risks for reoffending.

Policy Context

Since the development of the Blueprint for Youth Justice in the ACT 2012-22 (the Blueprint),49 the number of young people under community-based supervision has decreased. This trend shows that fewer young people are entering or coming into contact with the youth justice system.

The ACT Government provides a range of programs to support and divert young people who are on supervised community-based orders. These programs provide support around drug and alcohol issues, re-connecting young people with education and training, supporting the mental health and wellbeing of young people, and supporting them to access accommodation and connect with family and cultural support.

Results from this indicator have remained stable since 2014-15. These results will continue to inform monitoring and evaluation against the Blueprint, with the intention of refining and improving policy and operational processes.

How is the ACT Progressing?

Source: AIHW 2017, Youth Justice in Australia, 2016-17, Table S46b.

Note Trend data may differ from those previously published due to data revisions.

Source: AIHW 2017, Youth Justice in Australia, 2016-17, Table S52b.

Note Trend data may differ from those previously published due to data revisions.

Table 37: Number of ACT young people under community-based supervision by age, 2013-17

Age

2013-14

2014-15

2015-16

2016-17

10 years

0

0

0

0

11 years

0

1

0

0

12 years

4

1

3

2

13 years

5

4

6

10

14 years

15

18

18

20

15 years

28

27

29

22

16 years

37

38

31

38

17 years

43

36

47

37

18 years+

21

14

14

19

Total

153

139

148

148

Source: AIHW, Youth Justice in Australia, 2013-14, 2014-15, 2015-16, 2016-17, Table S36b.

Note Trend data may differ from those previously published due to data revisions. In the ACT, children and young people aged 10-17 years can be committed of a youth justice offence. However, youth justice involvement can continue after the age of 18, with the upper age limit for youth justice involvement being 21 years.

Table 38: Number of ACT young people under community-based supervision by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status and age at first supervision, 2014-17

 

Age at first supervision

2015-16

2014-15

2016-17

Aboriginal and/or  Torres Strait Islander

10-13 years

n.p.

10

8

14-17 years

30

25

35

18+ years

n.p.^

1

-

Total

39

36

43

Non-Aboriginal and/or  Torres Strait Islander

10-13 years

n.p.^

16

17

14-17 years

93

87

88

18+ years

n.p.^

-

-

Total

109

103

105

Source: AIHW, Youth Justice in Australia, 2014-15, 2015-16, 2016-17, Table S57.

Note Trend data may differ from those previously published due to data revisions. ^n.p. refers to not published due to small numbers, confidentiality, and/or reliability concerns. Legislation requires that the offence giving rise to youth justice involvement be committed while a young person is aged 10-17 years. However, youth justice involvement may continue with these young people after they reach adulthood. In the ACT the upper age limit for youth justice involvement is 21 years.

The number of young people under community-based supervision in the ACT continues to show a downward trend since 2011-12. The number of non-Indigenous young people under community-based supervision had a significant decrease from 188 (2008-09) to 105 (2016-17).

In general, there were more young males than females experiencing community-based supervision in the ACT which is consistent with the national situation and also with results in previous years.

Most young people under community-based supervision were between 15 and 17 years of age.

49 ACT Government 2017, Blueprint for Youth Justice in the ACT 2012–2022 Progress Report 2012–17