In a life threatening emergency dial Triple Zero (000)

In a life threatening emergency dial Triple Zero (000)
ACT Public Hospitals

Canberra Hospital

5124 0000


Calvary Hospital

6201 6111

Mental Health

Call Mental Health Triage on

1800 629 354

(free call except from mobiles or public phones) or

6205 1065

Poisons Hotline

For a poison emergency in Australia call

131126

Drug and Alcohol Help Line

The Drug and Alcohol Help Line is available 24-hours, 7 days a week on

5124 9977

Health Protection Service

For after hours urgent public health matters including environmental health, radiation safety, food poisoning and communicable disease management phone:

(02) 6205 1700

healthdirect

24 hour health advice

1800 022 222

ACT State Emergency Service

Emergency help
during flood or storms

132 500


Youth Unemployment and Underemployment


Indicator description

The rate of young people who are unemployed and underemployed.

What do we measure?

Youth unemployment rate in this analysis is the number of unemployed young people aged 15-24 years in the ACT, who were not attending full time education, expressed as a percentage of the youth (aged 15-24 years) labour force.

Youth underemployment rate is the number of young people aged 15-24 years in the ACT, who were underemployed, expressed as a percentage of the youth (aged 15-24 years) labour force.

Underemployed youths are employed young people aged 15-24 years in the ACT who want, and are available for, more hours of work than they currently have.

Why is this important?

Youth unemployment and underemployment has been recognised as a growing problem for Australia.42 Research has shown that youth unemployment has a negative impact on an individual's long term welfare 43 and underemployment and unemployment can contribute to the marginalisation of vulnerable young people. Information obtained from these indicators can inform government policies and services to support young people to remain in school or obtain employment.

Policy Context

The ACT Government seeks to ensure all Canberrans, including young people, have the opportunity to develop their skills and work to their maximum potential, through a vibrant, accessible and flexible training sector.

A number of government supported training pathways are available to the ACT community, including:

  • Australian Apprenticeships - providing training in conjunction with employment
  • CIT - offering more than 400 different qualifications to a diverse range of students
  • Skilled Capital - providing high quality training and filling critical skills needs areas across a range of industries.

VET qualifications allow for better employment opportunities, higher wages, and the prospects of achieving higher skills and qualifications.

VET programs contribute to many young Canberrans making successful transitions from school to work, further education or training. Young people who are not fully engaged after leaving school - including those who are in part-time work only, or are unemployed or are not in any form of study or the labour market - are at greater risk of an insecure future.

Foundation skills delivered through VET programs allow young people to engage in further education and skills development. Improving overall levels of literacy and numeracy is essential to improving workforce participation and labour productivity, and reducing social exclusion.

How is the ACT Progressing?

Figure 24: Unemployment rate (%) for ACT young people aged 15-24 years and not attending full-time education (12-month moving average) and for people aged 15 years and above (trend), 2013-18

Figure 24

Source: ABS cat. no. 6202.0; 6291.0.55.001 and ACT Treasury's calculation.

The trend unemployment rate for young people in the ACT, in the 12-month moving average terms, was 8.4 per cent in May 2018, slightly above the five-year average of 8.2 per cent. The trend youth unemployment rate has been above the five-year average since February 2017.

Figure 25: Underemployment rate (%) for ACT young people aged 15-24 years (12-month moving average) and for people aged 15 years and above (12-month moving average), 2015-18

Figure 25

Source: ABS cat. no. 6202.0; 6291.0.55.001 and ACT Treasury's calculation.

Note The 12-month moving average data can only be presented from June 2015. This is due to data availability from July 2014 to allow a full financial year moving rate calculation. The ABS publishes estimates of youth unemployment, youth underemployment and overall underemployment in original terms only. Original data is usually highly volatile and should be used with caution. The unemployment rate and underemployment rate for young people as well as overall underemployment can vary significantly in a short period and is subject to relatively high error as it is derived from a small sample. Hence, the data for unemployment rate and underemployment rate for young people as well as overall underemployment are presented in the 12-month moving average terms in order to show the underlying trends of these indicators.

The trend underemployment rate for young people in the ACT, in 12-month moving average terms, was 15.5 per cent in May 2018, below the five-year average of 15.7 per cent. The trend youth underemployment rate has been below the five-year average since September 2016.

42 Brotherhood of St Laurence, On the Treadmill: Young and long-term unemployed in Australia, p.2.
43 World Health Organization 2005, Global Strategy on Diet, Physical Activity and Health

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