In a life threatening emergency dial Triple Zero (000)

In a life threatening emergency dial Triple Zero (000)
ACT Public Hospitals

Canberra Hospital

5124 0000


Calvary Hospital

6201 6111

Mental Health

Call Mental Health Triage on

1800 629 354

(free call except from mobiles or public phones) or

6205 1065

Poisons Hotline

For a poison emergency in Australia call

131126

Drug and Alcohol Help Line

The Drug and Alcohol Help Line is available 24-hours, 7 days a week on

5124 9977

Health Protection Service

For after hours urgent public health matters including environmental health, radiation safety, food poisoning and communicable disease management phone:

(02) 6205 1700

healthdirect

24 hour health advice

1800 022 222

ACT State Emergency Service

Emergency help
during flood or storms

132 500


Year 10-12 Apparent Retention


Indicator description

The proportion of Year 10 students continuing to Year 12.

What do we measure?

The number of full-time equivalent Year 12 students enrolled in a given year as a proportion of students enrolled in Year 10 two years earlier. Also measured is the Year 10-12 apparent retention rate of full-time Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students.

Why is this important?

Higher education levels are associated with increased opportunities for employment, improving future income, increased standards of living and access to health care. Completing school provides many opportunities to improve both economic and social wellbeing. As the number of low-skilled jobs in the employment market decreases, the importance of educational qualifications increases.41

Other factors being constant, a higher or increasing apparent retention rate suggests that a large number of students are continuing to participate in school education which is likely to result in improved educational and employment outcomes.

Policy Context

The National Youth Participation Requirement includes the requirement for all young people to participate in schooling until they complete Year 10, and the requirement to participate full time in education, training or employment, or a combination of these activities until the completion of Year 12 or until they reach the age of 17.

Apparent Retention Rate (ARR) provides an indicative measure of the proportion of full-time school students who have stayed at school, for a designated year and grade of education. It is expressed as a percentage of the respective cohort group that those students would be expected to have come from, assuming an expected rate of progression of one grade per year. A higher or increasing rate is desirable as it suggests that a larger proportion of students are continuing in school, which may result in improved educational outcomes.

The increase in retention from Year 10 to Year 12 over the last seven years is in line with the policy intent of the ACT Government in strengthening requirements for 15-17 year olds to participate in full time education and/or training and/or employment.

The Year 10-12 ARR for all ACT students increased between 2011 and 2017 and is higher than national results. From 2011 to 2017, the ACT Year 10-12 ARR continued to be approximately 10 percentage points higher than the Australian Year 10-ARR.

The ACT Year 10-12 apparent retention rate of full-time Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students increased from 78.4 per cent in 2011 to 84.6 per cent in 2017, an increase of 6.4 percentage points. This increase is consistent with the national result where the Year 10-12 ARR of full-time Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students was 53.5 per cent in 2011, increasing to 63.0 per cent in 2017. For both the ACT and nationally, the period 2011-17, the ARR from Year 10 to Year 12 increased for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students at a greater rate than for non-Indigenous students, albeit off a lower base.

The ARR for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students are influenced by a number of factors including: the relatively small numbers of students identifying as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander in each cohort; movement of students into and out of the jurisdiction; and the extent of training and employment programs that provide alternative options to senior secondary schooling.

Calculating the retention rate can be inherently difficult, as it does not take into account students who repeat, move interstate, and transfer between schools or school sectors, and students who have left school previously but return to continue their school education.

How is the ACT Progressing?

Table 35: Apparent Retention Rates (%) of all students in the ACT and Australia, 2011-17

  

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

All students

ACT

90.0

89.3

90.4

92.4

95.1

92.2

92.1

Australia

79.5

79.3

80.7

82.5

82.7

82.9

83.3

Male students

ACT

87.5

88.4

88.7

91.1

92.2

90.3

89.4

Australia

75.5

75.5

77.4

79.5

79.7

79.7

80.1

Female students

ACT

92.4

90.4

92.1

93.7

98.1

94.3

94.9

Australia

83.7

83.3

84.1

85.7

85.9

86.1

86.6

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students

ACT

78.4

65.4

64.2

79.6

87.4

93.2

84.6

Australia

53.5

53.3

55.8

60.4

60.6

60.9

63.0

Source: ACT Education Directorate 2018.

Source: ACT Education Directorate 2018.

Source: ACT Education Directorate 2018.

Source: ACT Education Directorate 2018.Yr 10-12

41 ACT Government Community Services Directorate 2016, A Picture of Children and Young People 2016