In a life threatening emergency dial Triple Zero (000)

In a life threatening emergency dial Triple Zero (000)
ACT Public Hospitals

Canberra Hospital

5124 0000


Calvary Hospital

6201 6111

Mental Health

Call Mental Health Triage on

1800 629 354

(free call except from mobiles or public phones) or

6205 1065

Poisons Hotline

For a poison emergency in Australia call

131126

Drug and Alcohol Help Line

The Drug and Alcohol Help Line is available 24-hours, 7 days a week on

5124 9977

Health Protection Service

For after hours urgent public health matters including environmental health, radiation safety, food poisoning and communicable disease management phone:

(02) 6205 1700

healthdirect

24 hour health advice

1800 022 222

ACT State Emergency Service

Emergency help
during flood or storms

132 500


Children fully Immunised


Indicator  description

The proportion of ACT children aged 60-63 months of age who are fully immunised.

What do we  measure?

The proportion of children aged 60-63 months of age who are fully immunised according to the Australian Immunisation Register (AIR).

Why is this important?

Immunisation protects children, young people and adults against harmful infections before they come into contact with infections in the community. Immunisation uses the body's natural defence mechanism - the immune response - to build resistance to specific infections. Immunisation helps children stay healthy by building resistance to specific infections.13

Policy Context

The data indicates that the ACT continues to have high coverage rates for this cohort.

ACT Health undertakes numerous activities to increase coverage rates including:

  • reminder letters sent to the parents of children due for immunisation including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children
  • follow-up of all children recorded as overdue for immunisation in the AIR
  • ACT Health immunisation webpage
  • immunisation newsletter
  • provider information packs for the annual influenza vaccination or any new or changed immunisation programs
  • promotional materials for parents and immunisation providers
  • immunisation enquiry line
  • transcribing of overseas immunisation histories.

In 2016 there was a significant decrease in the proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children who were fully immunised at 60–63 months. In response, ACT Health took action to increase the immunisation coverage rates for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children through a suite of activities including:

  • monthly reminders sent to the parents of all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children
  • names of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children overdue sent to Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service and MACH team
  • postcards sent to parents of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children to remind them of immunisations prior to their child turning two, four, six, 12 and 18 months or four years
  • intensive investigation of every Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander child from three months to five years who is recorded as overdue for immunisations. The information from the investigation is used to develop tailored individual follow up
  • resources and information developed by the Health Protection Service (HPS) for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community. This promotional campaign consists of posters, brochures, and an immunisation reminder postcard
  • meetings held by HPS staff with Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service, Health Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health unit and the Capital Health Network Closing the Gap team
  • close liaison with with the Commonwealth Department of Health, the AIR and immunisation providers on this issue.

The impact of these actions was positive with a big increase of more than 7.0 per cent of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children being immunised at this age.

How is the ACT progressing?

Source: Australian Government Department of Health historical coverage data tables for all children, 2010-17.

The proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children fully immunised aged 60–63 months in the ACT has fluctuated over time.

Source: Australian Government Department of Health historical coverage data tables for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children.

Note The very low numbers of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in the ACT means that ACT Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander coverage data should be read with caution, as the immunisation coverage rates can fluctuate greatly. Coverage rates can vary dramatically between cohorts and between reporting periods The proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children fully immunised aged 60-63 months in the ACT has fluctuated over time.

13 Australian Government Department of Health, Understanding Childhood Immunisation, Immunise Australia