In a life threatening emergency dial Triple Zero (000)

In a life threatening emergency dial Triple Zero (000)
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5124 0000


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(free call except from mobiles or public phones) or

6205 1065

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For a poison emergency in Australia call

131126

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The Drug and Alcohol Help Line is available 24-hours, 7 days a week on

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For after hours urgent public health matters including environmental health, radiation safety, food poisoning and communicable disease management phone:

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Emergency help
during flood or storms

132 500


Smoking during Pregnancy


Indicator  description

The proportion of ACT resident women who smoked tobacco during pregnancy.

What do we  measure?

The number of women who report smoking tobacco during pregnancy.

Why is this important?

Smoking during pregnancy is the most common preventable risk factor for pregnancy complications, and is associated with poorer perinatal outcomes such as low birthweight, preterm birth, small for gestational age babies and perinatal death.2

Policy Context

ACT Health commenced the Smoking in Pregnancy (SiP) project in 2015 in response to findings reported in the 2014 ACT Chief Health Officer's Report 3 that indicated a high prevalence of smoking amongst younger women who were pregnant, as well as amongst Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander pregnant women generally.

The program aims to reduce smoking in young pregnant women and consists of three elements: behaviour change campaigns; nicotine replacement therapy where clinically indicated for young pregnant smokers, partners, household members and peers; and service sector capacity building (smoking cessation and motivational interviewing training).

How is the ACT progressing?

Source: ACT Health, Epidemiology Section. Maternal Perinatal Data Collection, unpublished data. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW), National Perinatal Data Collection, published data.

The proportion of ACT resident women who smoked during pregnancy has decreased significantly from 15.4 per cent in 2004 to 6.6 per cent in 2015 (Figure 6). The proportion of ACT women who smoke during pregnancy is consistently significantly lower than the national rate (Figure 7).

Source: ACT Health, Epidemiology Section. Maternal Perinatal Data Collection, unpublished data. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW), National Perinatal Data Collection, published data.

Table 3: Proportion (%) of ACT resident women who smoked during pregnancy by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status, 2004-06 to 2013-15

  

2004-06

2007-09

2010-12

2013-15

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander

ACT

45.0

52.7

49.8

44.6

Australia

51.9

50.7

50.0

45.0

Non-Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander

ACT

13.8

11.4

8.3

5.6

Australia

15.6

14.0

11.6

12.2

Source: ACT Health, Epidemiology Section. Maternal Perinatal Data Collection, unpublished data. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW), National Perinatal Data Collection, published data.

Note The data has been grouped into three-year periods due to the small number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women who reside in the ACT and give birth each year.

These data results demonstrate that whilst the overall proportion of women smoking during pregnancy is low in the ACT compared with the rest of Australia, there is a link between lower maternal age, Indigenous status and smoking during pregnancy.

2 AIHW 2015, Australia’s mothers and babies 2013 — in brief, Perinatal statistics series no. 31, cat. no. PER 72.
3 ACT Government 2014, 2014 ACT Chief Health Officer’s Report, accessed 23 April 2018